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Do you think that after-school programs are helpful in improving long-term at-risk students' futures?

  • They need something to do

    Students need stuff to do after school in order to not get into trouble. The idle mind and the bored child is where discipline issues come from. These kids need supervision as well as the academic experiences that after school programs can provide for them. Every student should be in them.

  • Yes, I think after school programs are helpful in improving long term at-risk student's futures.

    I think after school programs give a student' who lives in a rough community something to do in a positive setting as opposed to going home to a likely dangerous setting and getting into trouble, so overall it probably teachers the child positive lessons and improves their future outlook by seeing that there is more to life then a life of crime.

  • Yes, after-school programs are helpful in improving long-term at-risk students' futures.

    Yes, after-school programs are helpful in improving long-term at-risk students' futures. Evaluations of after school programs have shown that students benefit from them in multiple ways. It mainly helps with their course work, giving them more time to focus on homework without the distractions of TV and video games at home. It also helps improve their behavior.

  • yes they are

    Yes, if you take a kid that would be going home and doing something bad, or being exposed to a bad thing, and you let him go to a fun after school program instead, then you will do a whole lot of good for that kid and maybe change him.

  • After school programs improve student's futures

    After school programs improve student's futures. After school programs are always shown to greatly benefit any and all futures of students that were once thought to be, and known as: long term at risk students. The value of the after school programs many students of today's schools receive as a result of the major evaluations of student assessments are solid.

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