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Does America need a federal law prohibiting workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation?

  • Discrimination is always wrong.

    There are a lot of workplace discrimination and we have to work through it and there is nothing wrong with being gay. There is nothing that can be done about it but discrimination is still wrong. Unfortunately a lot of employers will find other ways to discriminate. They make up reasons and excuses within the bounds of reason.

  • A federal law is needed

    Yes, America needs a federal law prohibiting workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation. Without this, there is virtually nothing stopping employers from discriminating against gays and lesbians. The sexual orientation of a person should not matter. The work they do is all that should matter. A federal law could help to ensure that everyone is treated fairly.

  • Yes, gays need protection under the law.

    As of right now, gay people should not be discriminated against. But if there is no law stating it, people will feel that it is fine. Hopefully there will come a time when we don't need to protect the ideas or desires that people follow, but until that time comes, people who are affected need to be protected. Otherwise, gay people will find themselves as second class workers.

  • My Coworker Is Gay And He Gets To Slack Off

    The work place needs to become more equal and include everybody for diversity. Currently at my work, there is a gay man. He is very nice and smart too but there is problem. My boss doesn't want to give him too much work because he is afraid he will be seen as homophobic. Now we need equality for all sexual orientations so that he should have to do his fair share of work.

  • Justice for all

    I think this is a no brainier you can't discriminate if your hiring people it's basic rights. If you don't want to hire a gay person that bad then I think it's fairly simple you just throw away their application after they leave. If they come back just tell them someone else was better then you and had better qualifications that I was looking for it's that simple really. But if your telling someone I don't want to hire you because your gay in their face it's out of order it needs to be done behind the scenes.

  • The voting topic should be elaborated

    But if you are talking about employment discrimination, then no. This is similar to the Affirmative action issue, if the employer finds that men may be more suitable to the job more than women then the employer has the right to refuse employment. Jobs that require animal testing or certain types of surveying and case studies aren't suitable to women. Psychologically proven, although controversial to feminists, that women are more prone being 'soft'. Employment should be based on qualification, not by gender or race.

  • NO, Because we have plenty of laws protecting everyone against workplace Discrimination for any reason. http://www.eeoc.gov/federal/otherprotections.cfm http://www.eeoc.gov/federal/otherprotections.cfm

    We already have a law that is enforced. Facts about Discrimination in Federal Government Employment Based on Marital Status, Political Affiliation, Status as a Parent, Sexual Orientation, or Transgender (Gender Identity) Status
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    Laws Enforced By the EEOC
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    The EEOC enforces the prohibitions against employment discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Titles I and V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Title II of the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), and the Civil Rights Act of 1991. These laws prohibit discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, and genetic information, as well as reprisal for protected activity. The Commission's interpretations of these statutes apply to its adjudication and enforcement in federal sector as well as private sector and state and local government employment.
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    The EEOC has held that discrimination against an individual because that person is transgender (also known as gender identity discrimination) is discrimination because of sex and therefore is covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. See Macy v. Department of Justice, EEOC Appeal No. 0120120821 (April 20, 2012), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0120120821%20Macy%20v%20DOJ%20ATF.txt. The Commission has also found that claims by lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals alleging sex-stereotyping state a sex discrimination claim under Title VII. See Veretto v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Appeal No. 0120110873 (July 1, 2011); Castello v. U.S. Postal Service, EEOC Request No. 0520110649 (Dec. 20, 2011), http://www.eeoc.gov/decisions/0520110649.txt.
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    Federal Laws Prohibiting Job Discrimination Questions And Answers

    Federal Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Laws
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    I. What Are the Federal Laws Prohibiting Job Discrimination?

    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin;
    the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA), which protects men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination;
    the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), which protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older;
    Title I and Title V of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (ADA), which prohibit employment discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities in the private sector, and in state and local governments;
    Sections 501 and 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities who work in the federal government;
    Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), which prohibits employment discrimination based on genetic information about an applicant, employee, or former employee; and
    the Civil Rights Act of 1991, which, among other things, provides monetary damages in cases of intentional employment discrimination.
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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforces all of these laws. EEOC also provides oversight and coordination of all federal equal employment opportunity regulations, practices, and policies.
    http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/qanda.html


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