• The knights templar

    After Christian fighters captured Jerusalem during the First Crusade, groups of pilgrims from across Western Europe began visiting the Holy Land. Many were killed while crossing through Muslim-controlled territory during their journey. Around 1118, a French knight named Hugues de Payens founded a military order along with eight relatives and acquaintances, calling it the Poor Knights of the Temple of King Solomon (later known as the Knights Templar). With the support of Baldwin II, the king of Jerusalem, they set up headquarters on the sacred Temple Mount and pledged to protect Christian visitors to the city.

    After facing initial criticism by religious leaders, in 1129 the knights received the formal endorsement of the Catholic Church and support from Bernard of Clairvaux, a prominent abbot. New recruits and lavish donations began pouring in from across Europe. (Though the Templars themselves took vows of poverty, the order could accrue wealth and land.) It was also around this time that the knights adopted an austere code of conduct and their signature style of dress: white habits emblazoned with a red cross.

    The Knights Templar Branch Out
    Now numbering in the thousands, the Templars established new chapters throughout Western Europe. They developed a reputation as fierce warriors during key battles of the Crusades, driven by religious fervor and forbidden from retreating unless vastly outnumbered. They also set up a network of banks that enabled religious pilgrims to deposit assets in their home countries and withdraw funds in the Holy Land. Along with their donated fortune and various business ventures, this system gave the Knights Templar enormous financial sway. At the height of their influence, they boasted a sizeable fleet of ships, owned the island of Cyprus and served as a primary lender to European monarchs and nobles.

    Posted by: jj24
  • Assassins creed is true.

    I have been playing Assassins Creed for about 4 years now, and since then, my history class grades have been really good. Yeah it may have a fictional plot, but alot of it is true. I was told by my mom and her boyfriend that all of it is fake, but they haven't sat down and played it or payed attention to it. But still, a lot of it is true. AC3 is the best one.

  • Assassins creed could teach history to students

    This game is an immersive experience and is filled with the knowledge and the history of the world of times gone by and people long gone who stand out throughout all of history and they shall never ever be forgotten because they contributed towards the ever-changing human existence and giving their experiences to their own kind

  • Depends on the player

    You could rush through the whole game without learning a thing: cancel all videos, don't listen, just do missions and kill people. On the other side, an interested player could watch the cutscenes, read the extra information about all the people, buildings, boats,...
    So I would say you CAN learn a lot about history, if you are willing to.

  • Yes it does

    In assassins creed syndicate it teaches about frederick abberline the famous investigator and jack thee ripper.Jack the ripper is the person who murdered 5 female prostitutes in london,Fredrick the investigator studied and tried to look for jack .So yes assassin creed do indeed teach history.My name is savion king and I go to kippimpact middle school in duval jax

  • Yes it does

    In assassins creed syndicate it teaches about frederick abberline the famous investigator and jack thee ripper.Jack the ripper is the person who murdered 5 female prostitutes in london,Fredrick the investigator studied and tried to look for jack .So yes assassin creed do indeed teach history.My name is savion king and I go to kippimpact middle school in duval jax

  • Almost same as my history class

    I learned in school about (btw I'm 14) the Borgia family, Leonardo da Vinci, Machiavelli and the dates and years are correct when Rodrigo Borgia became the pope in Rome. Also when the American civil war happened, and has many real historical characters: Washington, Paul Revere, Ben Franklin, general Putnam...Overall AC does alter and change some things and events, but not that much, it has way more accurate stuff than incorrect.

  • No History Class, but...

    I'm a major fan of the games. I've grown a bit tired of the simplicity of the combat, but that's not what keeps me coming back. Me, I just love the narrative. I'm not going to say that Assassins Creed is like going to History Class, but you can stand to learn a thing or two about some of History's greatest leaders, warriors, etc. A lot of the characters that you come across are real, or based on real figures that have lived the era that you are playing in.

    Growing up I knew who Leonardo Di Vinci was from the Ninja Turtles, and later Dan Brown. Outside of that, I knew that he was some artist. It wasn't until University that I got to learn about how his work has inspired generations of inventors. By that time, Assassins Creed II was out, and sure... It exaggerated the character, but it gave you an interactive look at some of his inventions, his art, etc.

    The same can be said about Saladin, the Medici family, any number of the pirates present during Black Flag.

    It even does a good job at teaching geography, and simpler facets of engineering at some points. Heck, in Rogue... Once you get a hold of your ship and are free to roam the Atlantic, the first real land you can discover is actually my home town.

    It goes beyond that though. I remember the feeling of awe that I got when I was approaching Damascus and Acre for the first time on horseback. You pass through lines of people leaving the city, or on pilgrimage, see the fortifications. The games may not be 100% historically accurate, but they give you a good atmosphere to play with.

    Ultimately though, what it comes down to is the fact that children here in North America don't really want to learn anymore. They want to do. Often times people as a whole have an easier time learning when there is interactivity involved.

    No, I'm not saying your little ones should play this, but I'll certainly say this:

    Assassins Creed provides an entertaining, and interactive look at History. It is almost like a "What If?" kind of story. This series really gets you interested about history.

    Have I learned enough to pass a History exam from the series? Probably not. I will tell you this though. Not an entry in the series goes by that doesn't have me researching some of the characters historical counterparts.

    It educates,
    it's fun,
    often well written,
    beautiful to look at,
    Assassins Creed wins all around.

  • Assassin's Creed Boats

    I haven't played AC: Black Flag, but from watching my dad play it, I learned the names of some of that time's boats. For example, I never knew that there was a type of boat called a "Man o' War", or a "schooner". I'm not a historical expert and I haven't gone to college (yet), but I feel like even from watching the story and gameplay of Assassin's Creed: Black Flag, I've learned a lot about that time.

  • I learnt more history from Assassins Creed than from school

    This game is beyond words. It teaches history unlike an history book they will get you to read at school. It is a magnificent masterpiece. Complete and fulfilling. You can learn all of history from assassins creed. It just slightly changes it to match the storyline but that is all

  • Assassins Creed is a fictional narrative.

    While it is set during historical periods of time, and it even manages to include some historically accurate points in time, the main narrative is about the knights templar and a cult of assassins waging a war lasting centuries. It also includes notions that humans were created by an alien race, and that there's an orb which has the power to save the world from destruction. If you think that's historical accuracy at it's finest, what are you smoking and where can I find some? It sounds awesome.

  • As a history student, I think that they make too many mistakes.

    They ofcourse have their own historian who makes sure that to a certain degree, their games are actually showing historical events.
    But these people have to write an entire story each 2 years of an entirely new period. We cannot expect them to do all necessary research.

    For example, Machiavelli is considered a famous and good person, so they make him an assassin. The Borgia are considered evil, so they make them templars. Unfortunately, the historian hasn't even read Machiavelli's "Il Principe" and missed the fact that Machiavelli was supporting the Borgia and praised them whenever he could.
    I'm not a medieval expert, but I'm sure similar mistakes have been made all along. For example, the deaths of certain characters are contradictory to history just so the player would be able to defeat the bad guy personally.
    In AC II, they were decent enough to let Roderigo Borgia live but you still got to beat him up. How is that historically accurate? Blackbeard died while getting his head cut off and being captured. His enemies triumphed. In AC IV though, no mention is made about this heroic victory and instead, Edward Kenway even saves his own men and defeats all enemy ships.

    PRO argues that it does teaches SOME history, to a certain degree. In order to actually teach history, it should stick with the facts and not alter history even one bit. I know it is hard to do such a thing, but making Lorenzo De' Medici seem like less of a tyrant is wrong. There are points where it did not matter for the templars-assassins storyline, but they still altered history.

    Lastly I would like to add that it does provide a slight start for someone to gain interest in an era. Children will know about terms as "Boston tea party" and "Boston masacre" thanks to AC.
    Unfortunately though, they will picture it entirely wrong and unless they take their time to look it up, even the descriptions in the sequence menu thing do not provide the actual historical truth.

    I am also very afraid that they make history too black & white, for example, IF they do the napoleontic era, either the French or the English will become the evil templars and the other side the good assassins. History is not like that. It would be wrong if thanks to this series, people would think of the actual medieval templars as "evil, bad persons".

    My personal conclusion?

    Don't use this to teach yourself history. It is only there as an arousal for your interest.

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