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  • Yes, it does make sense to rob a bank to go to prison.

    According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness there are nearly 600,000 homeless individuals in the U.S. in 2016. It is also estimated that nearly 2 percent are chronically homeless meaning they have been homeless for a year or longer. For many of these individuals an arrest for bank robbery will mean they have shelter, healthcare, clothing and food long-term. When faced with little to no hope for these life necessities, robbing a bank would guarantee such things will be provided. This argument is contingent on a weapon not being used in process of the criminal act. When using a weapon there is a likelihood that an innocent bystander may be shot by accident or that the police may use deadly force.

  • No, it never makes sense to want to go to prison.

    No, it never makes sense to want to go to prison, regardless of the circumstances. Plus, there are easier ways to get in trouble. By bringing a gun into a bank, one is risking his or her life. If someone else is there with a gun, shots may be fired.

  • No, this does not make sense.

    It does not make sense to rob a bank to go to prison. No crime is worth committing to go to prison. The idea that someone wants to go to prison is also baffling. Instead of committing a crime to go to prison, the troubled individual should seek professional help to find out why he wants to go to prison.

  • No, it doesn't.

    Going to prison is a terrible thing and has many devastating consequences, the least of which is the effect it has on your future prospects in life. It also delegates you from your family. It does not make sense to rob a bank just to go to prison even if it is to break someone else out.


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