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Does social media allow us to make stronger connections with people around us?

  • Social media does allow people to make stronger connections with people overseas, right next to you and in general.

    Social media allows introverts to open up easier, it strengthens their interactions with others and allows them to gain confidence. It changes their body to be more powerful and helps others to see them as more confident and powerful, but as well allows them to feel more powerful and confident. Social media is a simpler and easier way to ensure that bonds remain strong over distance. It is a told that shouldn't replace other ways but it should enhance it. Social media should give a reason to people to connect in ways that they can where as some can't do face-to-face.

  • Yes, it can.

    Social media gives people a connection to the outside world through the means of instant messaging, emailing, and online social networks. It allows people to talk to anyone around them or far away from them. On the other hand, it does seem unsafe to put out as much information as certain social media sites and apps ask us to upon signing up, but to be safe, you could always just keep that information to yourself instead of making accounts on sites or apps you don't think you can trust.

  • Social media CAN allow us to make stronger connection with people.

    There is no argument by me that it DOES make stronger connections. I believe that in most cases, it's mostly just simpler connections. But it allows bonds to remain strong over distance. I have found the ability to make friends overseas or in other countries that are meaningful. With conversations often coming easier than they do in person.

    Without the judgements we are all programmed to make in person when we interact with someone, we have developed an entirely new set for people we meet online. For those we already have an existing face to face relationship - we develop a mixture of both.

    I have found online, that many people who I would gradually move on from I stay connected with. For many it is superficial, but it was in person. For others it grows.

    Looking at our biological imperative for personal interaction, I tend to think of online interaction as a tool. It shouldn't replace other forms of interaction, but it can enhance (and in some cases lead to deterioration) relationships. It can also foster new relationships that would be difficult in face to face situations. Distance, language, even appearance. Yes - it's absolutely possibly that once a face to face meeting does happen, a lack of connection can be discovered, but just as often the opposite can occur.

    For those we already know, it lets us stay connected in more ways than just letter writing or telephone call. We share far more photos, videos, and moments of our lives. We also share silly, trivial and pointless content - which we typically do in regular conversation. I've noticed the tone of most people posts and comments follows their realize conversations. Now their is a wider audience, but people tend to still share and interact mostly with the same subset of people.

    I do believe it is valuable and powerful, but like all human inventions, there will always be unexpected ramifications both good and bad.

  • Socail media does allow us to make stronger connections

    Social media allows us to make stronger connections with people around us, for from social media, people share and post stuff about them no one would have know if there wasn't any social media around. Like on Instragram or Facebook or even twitter and many many more. A big example is what I'm doing right now !!

  • Of course it does.

    All of the responses to the right seem to be addressing the unasked question, is communication through social media better than physical interaction? To THAT question, I'd have to say both yes and no. As someone who has lived out of my home country for several years, social media has undoubtedly helped me maintain relationships with people from home, but it also enabled me to forge new ones with the people I had not yet met (though we knew we'd be working together in the future).

    I do concede that physical interaction provides for stronger, more meaningful relationships, but for those with large bases of friends--and in an increasingly mobile society--this option is rarely available.

    If we are to say that social media does not allow us the opportunity to make stronger connections with "people around us" (which, for the purpose of this argument, I am going to interpret as "people with internet access." After all, that is what the internet and social media have done--connect the world), if we are to say this, then we must be willing to declare relationships formed among protesters in Egypt as "weak," or "insignificant." Business partners who work with each other daily, yet have never met; husbands and wives who have met online--these too, along with countless other examples must be ignored. Small scale gatherings--parties, invitations, and other groups organized on social media sites--which facilitate communication with and organization of people with similar interests, these too must be discarded.

    And need I really say it? This site, this post. What are we doing on this site if not connecting with other people, entertaining opinions which span ethnic, cultural, and geographical borders?

    I believe what is needed is a broader (and I believe, more accurate) interpretation of what connection really is. Yes, it is nice to be in the physical presence of someone. But, surely, connection is broader than this...

    Writing letters, using a telephone, these too were early forms of technology which enhanced communication (and I believe connection follows, at least in this broader sense of the term) among people. We don't think of these things in the same way we do social media--and there are differences, obviously enough--but the function of enhanced communication is essentially the same.

    Admittedly, reading a post by "anonymous" doesn't leave me feeling warm, fuzzy, and strongly connected to "anonymous." But I prefer it to no connection with, and no knowledge of "anonymous." Social media sites proper--FB, Youtube, etc.--offer even more.

    Notice the language: "these sites OFFER...", "Social media ALLOWS...". These sites do not inherently create the connections. They merely provide a platform. If you don't believe social media offers the possibility of connecting more deeply with people, perhaps you should more closely analyze the way you use them.

  • Around us are more people tuned into their phones.

    More people are connected to people on their phones, and at a distance, or with other matters, than anyone around them physically. Like in cars commuting, people are alienated from one another. Now they telecommute not only with their computers, but with their phones. Therefore less interaction physically with others. The connections with others are not stronger, they're more impersonal. With FaceBook posts are not direct e-mail between individuals as well, they are to anyone interested accessible via the news feed.

  • Social Media does not allow us to make stronger connections with people.

    Social Media does not allow us to make stronger connections with people because these relationships we form through online communication are through technology where it prevents us from transmitting real feelings and emotions. In order to make a strong connection with someone, these variables must be included. In a world where we are able to hide behind our computer screens, pseudonyms and avatars the relationships we form is based on a person who is behind these false masks.

  • More connections does not necessarily mean stronger connections.

    Because connecting is easy, that doesn't necessarily mean that all connections made through social media are fruitful or strong. Social media makes it easier to keep up with family or friends, but strengthening connections requires interpersonal communication. There is a disingenuous aspect to communication that takes place exclusively through electronic devices. In order to strengthen bonds with those around us, we must have physical contact with others.

  • No social media is a mask.

    Of course social media is a way to meet people around the world, or in your area. But how is this connecting you to them? What if your "new friend" is a criminal and is lying with every sentence they write? You just made a bad connection, and what if you add friends to your social media? What do you get out of all the friends you have that you don't connect with? How does your connection get stronger? It doesn't. The best way to make a connection that's strong and steady is to personally meet people and get to know them better. It would be harder to lie 24/7 in front of someone's face than by social media.

  • Nothing can replace traditional face to face communication

    Social media are threatening to overpower us, we use technology so much, that I'm afraid it will become something we take for granted. Actually that's already happening. The same thing might happen with communication, although social media is a faster and easier way to communicate- it can not replace the benefits, and experience that face to face communication provides. With face to face communication, you build stronger links- and have a long-lasting relationship. Take into account how the human is more familliar with a human rather than a computer screen. Just imagine how ridiculous it sounds to be nervous around someone in person and completely comfortable talking to them on Facebook!

  • Absolutely not. (Word.)

    Not in the slightest. It allows for someone to arrange stronger connections, but never actually forge or maintain strong connections.

    From observation, the lean towards social media seems to deteriorate or seems to be an exit from making stronger connections to other individuals. Sharing experiences with someone in person seems to be the only way to make stronger connections.


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