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Does the culture of beauty affect the body image of young girls?

  • Of course, duh

    Most girls at my high school are annoying about physical emotion and drama of how skinny a woman is and how big her stack is online. They always are wearing padded bras and look really "hot" and they dont wear much making them more of a porno device less than a normal girl.

  • Of course, duh

    Most girls at my high school are annoying about physical emotion and drama of how skinny a woman is and how big her stack is online. They always are wearing padded bras and look really "hot" and they dont wear much making them more of a porno device less than a normal girl.

  • Of course, duh

    Most girls at my high school are annoying about physical emotion and drama of how skinny a woman is and how big her stack is online. They always are wearing padded bras and look really "hot" and they dont wear much making them more of a porno device less than a normal girl.

  • Now, social media and the internet is part of our culture and it is a big impact on young girls.

    Young girls are growing up with the internet and being on social media. People who use social media are glamorizing thin girls and eating disorders, causing young women to feel insecure about their body image. Promoting all different kinds of appearances of women on social media is necessary for teenage girls to not worry about their body image.

    Social Media users need to help establish that all women are beautiful because teenage girls have grown up seeing skinny, beautiful girls on tv and advertisements, and having to remember the standards of the way women are supposed to look. Especially, in this generation of teen girls now, there is social media as well to deal with. Kids grow up surrounded by society’s standards of the appearance of women. Young kids grow up with television and magazines as well. Having that for kids to see at a young age will affect them in the future, because when they get older it will be worse because there are much more things than just tv and magazines. For young girls, social media needs to set up a place where all women can be beautiful so that they do not grow up with worrying about their appearance because of standards set by our culture and society.

  • Culture effect lots of things

    Yes, culture of beauty affects the body images of young girls. Lets take Muslim girls for example, they have to wear something that covers complete body including face which is not visible to others. On the other hands lets look at American culture where body is more visible to others. I am not saying that it shouldn't be like that, i think everyone is entitled to fashion and style either in the culture or outside of culture.

  • Unsatisfied with ourselves

    The whole beauty industry is built on, “You’re not OK the way you are. We’ll make you better.” It would seem bizarre to us today, but 50 years ago, when television was brand new, there were commercials that would say, “Gain 10 pounds in a week, guaranteed.” Women bought these products until wafer thin was considered the best body to have. Then, for a while, Cindy Crawford brought in a new kind of image of models who looked healthier. Also, in advertisements a woman is often treated as a body or a collection of body parts and not a whole. For example, often you’ll see a part of a woman’s body — maybe her head isn’t showing and her knees and below aren’t showing, but the rest of her body is. That’s a clear objectification of a woman.

  • Of Course It Does

    Girls are being raised in a society that values a woman's beauty, body and sexuality more than any of their other traits and are taught these are their most valuable assets in life. They are taught they should always look flawless regardless of how they feel inside and that they will only be deserving of love and affection if they meet these minimum standards. Then after all of this, society mocks them for how much time and effort they put into their appearance.

  • Grew up knowing

    We grew up with thin and perfect princeeses that had everything, as we got older and enetered school, it seemed like the thin, pretty girls had everything. It starts as an experiment, and then an obsession. "If i get thin, will boys like me? Will I do better in life?" Even as adults, the models of beauty are everywhere, on tv, in magazines... But should they be in magazines or in a hospital? With commercials for anti aging makeups and cremes, combined with fairytales, with parents attempting to be thin, how will a young girl react except for, "is this how i should be?"

  • Akin to Conspiracy.

    I don't believe the media necessarily perpetuates any type of "correct" way to look. It's my belief that personal insecurities about ones image are not a result of "beauty culture" but a result of human nature. We want to look good, that's just natural. Some may say that the definition of "good" is varied, but when examining other species such as butterflies, we find that more symmetrical butterflies end up getting more mates.

    Humans are biologically ingrained with a definition of attractive. A young woman will not find herself insecure because of beautiful women she sees in shampoo commercials and movies, she will find herself insecure because of being an emotionally active 13-17 year old.

    Allow me to elaborate on my supporting headline. We are constantly searching for this source of insecurity that is not there. It's not the media, it's not the movies, it's young women who are concerned with being attractive and attracting the opposite sex.

    It's natural. It's human. It's not "beauty culture" telling overweight young women it's bad to be overweight, it's nature's way of saying leniency will get you nowhere.


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