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Does the drive for immediate profits short-change essential research?

  • Yes the drive for immediate profit shorts changes essential research

    I do agree with the statement that the drive for immediate profit short changes essential research. When a company or business manufacture and release a product they are entirely way to concerned witht the profits they can make immediately that they do not take the time needed to research how to retain and maintain customer satisfaction and retention in the long run.

  • Researchers neglect important research if it is not profitable.

    Very often, research into fields that could potentially benefit all mankind goes unfunded because it is not profitable enough. Companies invest in research only if it is going to make them money. They often take shortcuts in there research to produce the results they want. This means essential research is abandoned for non-essential research in order to make a buck.

  • In Some Cases

    I believe it is possible that the drive for immediate profits can short-change essential research. I would say inexperienced entrepreneurs are more apt to fall into this problem than those that are experienced. I believe a good business person understands that essential research is actually more helpful than short term profits.

  • Research times are sometimes shortened to make money faster.

    The drive for immediate profits can short-change essential research. This is because sometimes the leaders in charge of research stop working on their projects when they think there is "enough" evidence to support a "safe" or "effective solution". Sometimes if they had waited longer, they would see the effects are actually harmful.

  • Yes, profits short change results.

    It sounds ironic, but immediate profit tends to short-change essential research almost every time. A goal needs to be set to achieve something other than a lot of money right away. A lot of good research is being lost or never taking place because of greedy policies such as these.

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