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Does the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution provide too many protections to people charged with crimes?

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  • No: The US Constitution Does Not Provide Too Many Protections For Accused Criminals

    What we have seen over the last decade has been the erosion of protections for people in the US. Warantless wiretapping and the ability for the government to detain US citizens indefinitely are just two examples. The US is also the world's leader in terms of people locked up in their prison system. This government needs to protect citizen rights and foster a healthy society, rather than strip more protections from people.

  • No, due process doesn't provide too much protection.

    I do not think that the due process clause of the US Constitution provides too many protection to the people that are charged with crimes. I think that due process is something that everbody who is a citizen of America deserves. You are innocent until proven guilty. And it should stay that way.

  • No It Doesn't

    I do not believe the due process clause of the US Constitution provides too many protections to people charged with crimes. A charge does not indicate guilt and I feel that is something we have forgotten in our country. You're suppose to be innocent until proven guilty here. Those that are charged should retain all of their rights, especially those outlined for due process.

  • Rights are important.

    No, the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution does not provide too many protections to people charged with crimes, because the protections are very important. The government should not be stopping people at a check point on the highway. The government should not be interrogating its own citizens at will.


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