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Does the media put pressure on your body image and should there be laws to stop this?

  • The media has a negative effect on women's bodies.

    47% of girls say fashion magazines give them a body to strive for. You may think, yes, they are on a way to a healthy lifestyle. No, the average model weighs about 107 lbs.8 and is 5'10''. 107lbs.8 is underweight, and being underweight is very dangerous. It could cause cardiac problems, back problems, or poor wound healing. 80% of girls compare themselves to celebrity images. 31% of girls admit to starving themselves to look like those models. The Dove campaign is a great supporter, unlike the Victoria's Secret campaign, where they show those small, underweight models. Girls sacrifice their health to look like those unhealthy barbie dolls.

  • The media has a negative effect on women's bodies.

    47% of girls say fashion magazines give them a body to strive for. You may think, yes, they are on a way to a healthy lifestyle. No, the average model weighs about 107 lbs.8 and is 5'10''. 107lbs.8 is underweight, and being underweight is very dangerous. It could cause cardiac problems, back problems, or poor wound healing. 80% of girls compare themselves to celebrity images. 31% of girls admit to starving themselves to look like those models. The Dove campaign is a great supporter, unlike the Victoria's Secret campaign, where they show those small, underweight models. Girls sacrifice their health to look like those unhealthy barbie dolls.

  • Body images have a negative effect in women.

    We shouldn't have to look like barbie dolls to be beautiful. We are all beautiful in our own ways, thin or not. People are putting unrealistic images on the internet an in magazines to be 'pretty'. Photoshopped images of women are all over the place and they aren't even real and thats what people want women to look like? Unrealistic figures?

  • http://mhm.hud.ac.uk/planetradio/node/437 body image

    http://mhm.hud.ac.uk/planetradio/node/437

    I am a uni student and I have just created a radio piece on this topic, if you could debate opinions on my work it would be great...

    Click the link, listen, register and comment... Or you can just comment back to me on here, would be better if you could register though...
    Thanks

  • Pressuring people into thinking that their size is wrong or they should be more skinny is wrong.

    So many teens are worried about their size because the media says they should look some way. They have Victoria's secret models posted up every where, teens get bullied in school because of their size and these things can cause deaths whether it suicide or homicide something needs to be done fast.

  • Everywhere I look I am suffocated by images telling me I am not good enough.

    Give the next generation a chance to decide for themselves what is beautiful. Real models. No airbrushing. You can't put laws on this sort of thing but how can a young girl live up to the standards of being a Victoria's Secret model? We need companies to put morals before money. Sex sells and that's what they are giving us. STOP BUYING IN.

  • Decisive and definitive action is needed. NOW.

    Calories. A word most typical young girls fear. Growing up almost everyone deals with the process of losing that horrible baby fat. My first vogue magazine at the age of 13, glossy pages covered in alluring,so called beautiful women. Looking back now I have come to the realisation that these women who I aspired to look like are not beautiful they are skin and bone. Companies are now photo hopping women to the point in which But these twigs we see in the media are unrealistic and unhealthy, we need to come to the realisation that we ourselves are the true ideal of the human body. Why does the media judge others and labels women based on weight and size alone? How about intelligence or confidence? Take the Barbie doll as an example, from a young age women are given a Barbie doll, and hereby taught what perfect should be. She is the “perfect” size, tiny waist, massive boobs, skinny legs. This is completely false, this idealism is not perfect. This disgusting obsession with body image is detrimental to our physical and mental health, and yes it is that simple. In 2010 the UK government actually listened to what people were telling them and set up the “body confidence campaign”. But since the campaign launched we have not heard much about it, the odd article here and there then nothing. I have had personal experiences with airbrushing, when I entered a modelling competition at the age of 15, an insecure young women. My photos were airbrushed and I was told that my “thigh gap” was not sufficient, so they airbrushed the gap bigger. At this very insecure age when I was in the transition of puberty, striving for perfection, and covering all my inecuritys with buckets full of foundation, to be told I was essentially not skinny enough, bulldozed my self esteem. It is not only women who are affected by body image in print, men are too, they just rarely speak out about it. 37% of British males have admitted to lacking body confidence due to the medias perspective of the male body . This problem is just going to worsen, as the media are putting more and more pressure on the self-body image. 75% of cases of anorexia are due to a negative body image. Eating disorders, Anxiety, Depression and other mental health problems all place strain on our health services, these can all be simply addressed by taking decisive and definitive action regarding unrealistic representations of both genders.

  • Media...Who needs it

    Now a days a girl is judged by their appearance and It really grinds my gears. Jeesh everyones a critic. I know that girls are beautiful from the inside not the outside but if theyre beautiful from the outside then that's just a plus. But I like thick healthy girls. Amen sista.

  • The media does put pressure on your body image and there should be laws to stop this.

    The media does put pressure on your body image and there should be laws to stop this. You cannot pick up a magazine or turn on the television without some report on which celebrity looks better. This puts stress on our children who fight with eating disorders and fashion because of the media influence. I think sometimes the media goes too far calling a celebrity obese and there should be laws to stop this but there is also free press and free speech so I doubt anything could ever be done.

  • Yes, the media puts pressure on people's body images and there should be laws to stop this.

    I believe that the media puts pressure on people's body images and there should be laws to stop this. Just look at the increase in eating disorders, such as anorexia, with young women. Young girls are bombarded with images of thin women in all sorts of media-from television commercials to ads in magazines. There should be laws to stop this pressure, but that will never happen. The media should at least take on some responsibility for perpetuating the "deathly thin is in" image. The Dove soap campaign that says that beauty comes in all sizes is a start.

  • Where will the censorship end?

    I think it's better to educate our young people about what's healthy and about the marketing ploys the media uses to sell products rather than censor the media; if we start making laws of this type, then pretty soon the government will be dictating what the media can or can't print. Do we really want that?

  • Not what you think it is

    They can help you be healthier than you are now not just look better. Sometimes they can have what's best for you in there mind. They don't make you do it if you don't want to. You decide what to do not them. The pressure comes from your own mind!!!!!!!!!!!


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