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hypothermia and death: Should there be more money spent to study the effect of cold temperatures on the human body?

  • Yes, more research could result in better cold weather preparations

    If more money is spent to study the effect of cold temperatures on the human body, then we get more research, and more research may lead to better design of clothing and medication and better or more efficient prevention and treatment to those who have obtained hypothermia and ultimately lower death rates.

  • Yes, especially with climate change causing extreme temperatures.

    Cold weather affects infants, the elderly and the poor the most. These groups of people need to be protected from the environment. If more research can come up with easier ways to combat hypothermia, then we should all support increased funding for such studies. We can't control the weather, but we can manage our response to it and we need scientists to help us do that.

  • Yes, many people living in colder regions could benefit from such research.

    Yes, there should be more funding for the effects of freezing temperatures on human tissues. There are populations that are settled in colder regions (such as Alaska or Russia) who could benefit from this research. By understanding the microscopic affects of cold temperatures on human tissue cells, scientists could discover techniques to combat the destruction of these cells by freezing. If it would be possible to prevent cells from becoming frigid and lifeless in such harsh conditions, it could also be plausible to enhance the cells of living humans to survive more efficiently in colder climates, and therefore allow for populations to expand and explore these regions.

  • There is already a vast amount of knowledge on this topic.

    Hypothermia is a very serious condition that kills hundreds of individuals every year. However, more research isn't necessarily required as experts are well aware what causes the problem and the most effective ways of curing it. Money could be better invested in public health policy aimed at prevention rather than further research into the condition itself.


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