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In 1906, Dr. Alois Alzheimer presented his research on what would later be known as Alzheimer's Disease. The audience asked no questions because they simply wanted to hear the next lecture. Would greater resources have cured the disease by now?

In 1906, Dr. Alois Alzheimer presented his research on what would later be known as Alzheimer's Disease. The audience asked no questions because they simply wanted to hear the next lecture. Would greater resources have cured the disease by now?
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  • No, there is still a lot to be learned.

    Unfortunately I do not think that there would be a cure by now. There are medicines that help slow the progression but they cannot stop the progression once the disease has been detected. Since there is no definitive way to test for Alzheimer's except for brain biopsy after death, it may be hard to cure a disease if you can't "truly" be diagnosed with it until after death.

  • No cure exists

    I think scientists have made some progress in treating the disease and slowing it's progress. As the population ages, I think more resources are being devoted to dealing with Alzheimer's. Also we can screen earlier for the disease. As I understand it, the only way to cure it would be to be able to alter brain cells, to stop or delay the damage that causes the cognitive damage, and that hasn't happened yet.

  • Alzheimer's Disease would not have been cured any quicker if the original lecture audience had been more responsive

    While some progress may have been gained, Alzheimer's Disease would not be cured by now simply by having a better audience when the topic was first discussed in a lecture setting. Technology along with science have to progress through stages to reach a cure for such a difficult problem. The brain is so complex and difficult to study, this type of disease naturally takes a long time to cure. If anything, the topic may have gained from having the additional audience members present that day, if just one person would not have been there otherwise but ended up learning about the topic.

  • No they would not

    In 1906, Dr. Alois Alzheimer presented his research on what would later be known as Alzheimer's Disease. The audience asked no questions because they simply wanted to hear the next lecture. I can not possibly see how greater resources would have cured the disease by now. We are bound to cure the disease in the near future, as our medical sciences and knowledge have greatly improved.


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