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In ancient Greece, debate played a significant role in citizenship. Is this true of American society today?

  • U jag y

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  • U jag y

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  • No, debate does not play a significant role in American society.

    In order to have a well founded debate one must consider all of the available evidence and they choose a side based on that evidence. American society refuses to look at any evidence and picks a side based on ignorance. This leads to debates being meaningless in America as people cannot be convinced by logic.

  • Opposing sides are close-minded

    Few people today approach a public debate with an open enquiring mind. Rather they are liberal or conservative, for big government or small, for jobs or environment. They are not experienced in evaluating the arguments presented by each side. Yet, as presidential elections show, those in the middle are just as swayed by good oratory as the ancient Greeks.


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