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In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, is the creation human?

Asked by: breeden.s
  • How is it not?

    Based on the Merriam-Webster definition of human, a human is 1) of or relating to, or characteristic of humans 2) consisting of humans 3a) having human for or attributes 3b) susceptible to or representative of the sympathies and frailties of human nature. Just because the concept of creating life in such a fashion was alien in that time period, this does not mean that the creation itself is an alien. It has any characteristic a human would have. It has the ability to reason and is most definitely susceptible to any human emotions. It is, in fact, in Chapter 11 where we learn of the creation's journey and how he felt during this time.

  • No its noy

    How is it not? Based on the Merriam-Webster definition of human, a human is 1) of or relating to, or characteristic of humans 2) consisting of humans 3a) having human for or attributes 3b) susceptible to or representative of the sympathies and frailties of human nature. Just because the concept of creating life in such a fashion was alien in that time period, this does not mean that the creation itself is an alien. It has any characteristic a human would have. It has the ability to reason and is most definitely susceptible to any human emotions. It is, in fact, in Chapter 11 where we learn of the creation's journey and how he felt during this time.


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Craighawley215 says2014-10-06T04:31:53.837
That is the million dollar question, isn't it. The whole book is centered on the crux of Dr. Frankenstein and his creation: which one is the monster?