Amazon.com Widgets
  • Lol @ ADHD being fake or due to bad parenting

    When my child was four years old, he literally never sat down for more than 10 seconds. He never walked anywhere...He always hopped. He was so thin from constant hopping because he would never take time to eat. I had to follow him with bowls of food and shovel it into his mouth as he hopped. That was the only way he was going to get nutrition. I have a very polite and compassionate 21 year old with Autism and ADHD now. He could teach your child(ren) a few things about respect and manners, guaranteed. I invite you to come to my home and observe the way we live, THEN tell me it is made up or that I am a bad parent. I normally won't toot my own horn but I am one hell of a good mother...And have the product of such parenting to prove it! ADHD doesn't mean "being bad". You might want to research it a little more before making such assumptions.

  • In the 21st century, virtually all scientists and doctors agree that ADHD is real.

    For more than 30 years brain scans have been used to detect ADHD, and these brain scans detect significant differences in brain function in those who have ADHD to those who do not have the condition.

    It is important to realize that the ability to sit still and concentrate, like most other human functions, comes from the brain. It is not a matter of will power.

  • Of course it is

    ADHD, and its cousin ADD, are both very real. The reason people think they are not is due to how very over diagnosed they are. There are many systems, be they schools, therapists, or doctors, who will slap the diagnosis on any hyper or underachieving child, whether they have it or not. That does not mean it is not real, it is very real.

  • I have it

    Yes its real but I do not know how handicapping it is. Trying to fit into normal society is difficult but if you need someone who can handle stress like no other who gets going when the going gets tough they're who you need. We are not capable of many mundane tasks with any accuracy but things we are passionate about or are stressful come easy.

  • Yes, ADHD is Real

    ADHD is a very real disorder. The transformation from ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) to its current acronym has allowed for more people to be diagnose under the banner definition. I have seen first hand the effects of the disorder on a person's demeanor and quality of life. Just like any other learning disorder, ADHD is something that can be treated with medication and allow the sufferer to live a relatively normal life.

    Posted by: pdrm
  • YES

    As somebody who has been diagnosed with it, I can tell you that it's real. I would wager that it is probably misdiagnosed, but I have no doubt in my mind that it's real.

    Changing my diet didn't help, and for those that want to say that I used it to excuse laziness: I graduated from high school in the top fifteen percent of my class, I graduated from college with a 3.6 GPA, and I've been working since I was sixteen years old.

    I'm hardly what one could classify as a lazy, good for nothing slob.

    When you have ADHD, forcing yourself to concentrate creates a situation where you are quickly exhausted and your mind begins to rebel against you. I find myself bouncing my knee or something like that without even realizing it.

    I'm doing okay even without medication, but it's only because I have developed a minimalistic lifestyle where it's almost impossible to clutter things up, and I've gone into a field where my ADHD can actually be a plus at times.

  • I Have ADD/ADHD

    The world doesn't understand the how it feels to be unable to focus on things at all the distractions and then when you go on a computer and play a game time rushes by at seemingly impossible speeds. The boring school work thats easy can some times take two hours

  • I have ADHD

    You want to see the papers signed by my doctor himself? I'll gladly show you. You wanna see the the pill I take everyday for something that you apparently don't believe in, go ahead. I HATE people who are so insensitive to say that my condition is false. I really hate it.

  • I Wish There was a Middle Option

    Sorry if this is a double post. Debate.Org signed me out before I posted the last one.

    Many people on the "Yes" side are supporting false dichotomies.

    One says it is a matter of the brain and not willpower. BUT the two are not mutually exclusive. The distorted viewpoint found among many people on the yes side comes from the old and now discredited static idea of the brain.

    Of course ADHD is in the brain, but that in and of itself is not significant, nor enough to justify treating it as a real condition. Study after study shows that everything can effect the brain and that every difference in thought, behavior, personality, anything psychological shows differences in the brain. Everything. Extraversion v. Introversion. People thinking happy thoughts and people thinking sad thoughts (not just on average, I mean in the actual moment they are thinking those thoughts). Everything. And yes that means parenting could have an effect. Since parents interact a great deal with their children parents should be expected to have an impact on how the brain wires itself and the levels of chemicals within the brain.

    Including willpower and including deliberate efforts at change. A study of exsmokers shows that willpower can be changed and enhanced with practice.
    Http://www.Theglobeandmail.Com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/ex-smokers-are-willpower-kings-brain-scans-show/article4263270/

    A study of talk therapy for depression shows actual changes in brain chemistry and if the person stops treatment the changes last longer on average than if they take pills and then stop treatment.
    Http://www.Nytimes.Com/2002/08/27/health/behavior-like-drugs-talk-therapy-can-change-brain-chemistry.Html

    So why am I in the "yes" column? While I think ADHD is overdiagnosed (diagnosed more than is useful) I don't think the diagnosis is useless. I think we should change the way we think of mental disorders. Instead of thinking of them as rigid, solid, concrete entities think of them as are categories and labels that are used to guide treatment decisions to deal with problems related to thought and behavior. A person could well sit on the border of the spectrum and so different doctors may disagree about whether it would be helpful to diagnose the person.

    We should also use less drugs. Just because something has to do with neurochemistry does not mean we must use treatments that we most intuitively identify as being chemical. As the links I posted have shown all treatments are essentially chemical treatments. You do not need to use drugs to change your neurochemistry. Synthetic drugs often come with side effects including side effects we don't fully understand, and cognitive therapies are ancient since we have been doing them in one form or another any time someone tried to help someone else to change their habits or their thinking. Drugs should be a last resort. Cognitive therapy should be the first line of treatment for all but the most severe conditions.

    Disclaimer: Just my opinion, not to be taken as medical advice.

  • I wish there was a Middle Option

    Many people on the "Yes" side are supporting false dichotomies.

    One says it is a matter of the brain and not willpower. BUT the two are not mutually exclusive. The distorted viewpoint found among many people on the yes side comes from the old and now discredited static idea of the brain.

    Of course ADHD is in the brain, but that in and of itself is not significant, nor enough to justify treating it as a real condition. Study after study shows that everything can effect the brain and that every difference in thought, behavior, personality, anything psychological shows differences in the brain. Everything. Extraversion v. Introversion. People thinking happy thoughts and people thinking sad thoughts (not just on average, I mean in the actual moment they are thinking those thoughts). Everything. And yes that means parenting could have an effect. Since parents interact a great deal with their children parents should be expected to have an impact on how the brain wires itself and the levels of chemicals within the brain.

    Including willpower and including deliberate efforts at change. A study of exsmokers shows that willpower can be changed and enhanced with practice.
    Http://www.Theglobeandmail.Com/life/health-and-fitness/health/conditions/ex-smokers-are-willpower-kings-brain-scans-show/article4263270/

    A study of talk therapy for depression shows actual changes in brain chemistry and if the person stops treatment the changes last longer on average than if they take pills and then stop treatment.
    Http://www.Nytimes.Com/2002/08/27/health/behavior-like-drugs-talk-therapy-can-change-brain-chemistry.Html

    So why am I in the "yes" column? While I think ADHD is overdiagnosed (diagnosed more than is useful) I don't think the diagnosis is useless. I think we should change the way we think of mental disorders. Instead of thinking of them as rigid, solid, concrete entities think of them as are categories and labels that are used to guide treatment decisions to deal with problems related to thought and behavior. A person could well sit on the border of the spectrum and so different doctors may disagree about whether it would be helpful to diagnose the person.

    We should also use less drugs. Just because something has to do with neurochemistry does not mean we must use treatments that we most intuitively identify as being chemical. As the links I posted have shown all treatments are essentially chemical treatments. You do not need to use drugs to change your neurochemistry. Synthetic drugs often come with side effects including side effects we don't fully understand, and cognitive therapies are ancient since we have been doing them in one form or another any time someone tried to help someone else to change their habits or their thinking. Drugs should be a last resort. Cognitive therapy should be the first line of treatment for all but the most severe conditions.

  • Where is the biological evidence?

    There is no biological or medical evidence to properly conclude it as a "disorder". This is a social construct NOT a biological one. Why are 9% of American kids said to have ADHD and in France less than a half a percent of kids are diagnosed with ADHD? They even treat it differently through counseling and environmental changes. Show me medical PROOF of ADHD.... Fact is there isn't any!

  • Not necessarily real.

    It is real in that our society has basically "created" the disease. When the person who came up with it refers to it as a "fictitious disease", that should say a lot. ADHD is the result of many things: Over stimulation. Bad food choices. Bad food in general. Bad parenting. And an overall push by physicians to get people onto some form of drug. We don't cure things in 2013, we give medications to treat the symptoms. ADHD is never treated because to do so would mean a complete change in how our society operates.

    So it ADHD real? Not on its own. I don't have a smoking problem until I light a cigarette. I don't have a kid with ADHD until I start expecting my child to not be a child and then feed him (her) the genetically altered and drugged up foods available in our supermarkets.

  • Normal child behaviour

    Mental disorders are a label created when one's behaviour deviates from what is considered 'normal'. But 'normal' is a socially & culturally bound concept. Perhaps if society didnt focus so heavily on academics as a child's predictor of success and changed some social adjustments we would see a decline in the disorder

  • It's really been voted into existence.

    ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder was created with the last couple versions of the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders).

    The earlier version called it Attention Deficit Disorder. The DSM states in the text that there is no medical test or biopsy that can determine the existence of ADHD and that it is entirely a subjective diagnosis by the practitioner.

    The manual itself before being approved and published goes through a series of votes where top psychiatrists in the APA and similar organizations vote as to what they think should now be considered a disorder.

    The DSM that is being released soon (DSM-V) is being widely criticized for being full of absurd disorders and listing so many new ones. Caffeine addiction is in there; so is the disliking of math. But, no fear, there are drugs to help!


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.