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  • Affirmative actions does more harm than good!

    Affirmative action, in today's society, does just as much harm as it does good. The thing is, we now live in a society where the understanding of different cultures and values are respected (well as least in most places where affirmative action actually exists). We are no longer living in the past, but in the here and now. Every person applying for a job should not be discredited simply because they are "white" and were the favorable majority in the past. If we really do live in a mufti-diverse cultural society where every culture is now respected, various applicants for a job, no matter what their cultures may be, should be selected for their experience, work ethic, values, skills, and perseverance alone. Yes the past was an unfair place, but is it really fair that someone applying for a job who has more experience and skills than other applicants should be rejected right away simply because they are not of a particular ethic background that was treated unfairly in the past? Call me stupid, but isn't that also a form of indirect discrimination. If we really have progressed from the mistakes of our past, why not just have a society where everyone as equal chances and opportunities all the time, period!

  • Martin Luther King, Jr. said merits not skin color.

    Judge a person based on their merits, not on their skin color. End of story. Affirmative action is nothing more than reverse discrimination and has outlived its necessity as things are not like they were 50-60 years ago. Additionally, Affirmative Action is being abused to give unfair advantages based on skin color for everything including race based scholarships, race based academic clubs, etc. When the white people did that 50-60 years ago it was outlawed. Affirmative Action is doing nothing but changing society into the backwards-thinking, biased people we once were.

  • Two men walk into a drugstore.

    Two men walk into a drugstore: a middle-class black man with a throbbing headache and a poor white man with a gash on his finger. They walk up to the counter at the same time; the black man asks for some aspirin and the white man asks for some Band-Aids. The clerk throws a box of Band-Aids at the black man, stammers at the white man that he can't have any, and hides under the counter.

    In short, I do support actively giving opportunities to groups that are disadvantaged, but I don't think racial minorities are disadvantaged enough nowadays to justify affirmative action, especially when extra boosts at colleges and jobs doesn't really address the problem.

  • Affirmative action is unfair

    Affirmative action is unfair because it gives certain people an advantage at the expense of others. It does not matter what context it is in, this is always a recipe for inevitable unfairness. People should be judged on their credentials, not other less important components that are not going to effect their capability.

  • Yes, affirmative action is unfair.

    Yes, I believe that affirmative action is unfair. A century or two ago, racism and hatred toward African Americans and other minorities was so widespread and extreme, that it was often unsafe for these people to even walk outside in their own neighborhoods. Through the years, however, society has slowly assimilated and now is much more progressive then back then. Unfortunately, along with these changes, the mindset that people should go out of their way to help one person over another just brings us back to those times, as everyone should be treated equally. Affirmative Action does nothing but change society into the backwards-thinking, biased people they once were.

  • It Is Now

    Affirmative action is past its prime. White men make up only 31 percent of the population in America, so there is no more need to enact racial or sexual equality laws. Affirmative action was great for its time 40 and 50 years ago. It has outlived its usefulness as minorities are no longer in the minority, statistically speaking.

  • Yes it is unfair.

    Nobody cares if your professors are diverse in things that are more important than race, such as ideology and political views. Thus making it hard for me to believe that diversity is so important in a college setting. College is for learning not training on how to be socially accepting of other races.

  • Yes yes yes

    A a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

  • Of course it is!?...

    It's based on the same logic as "It's just as racist to vote for someone because they are black (Or any race) as it is to vote against someone because they are black. You're basing your decision on race! If people have souls and exist after their bodies die, no one will have a race, so why not just treat them like that now?

    Posted by: feh
  • The current situation is skewed.

    As a country, America has always had an issue with race. African Americans and Native Americans are usually singled out as the most discriminated against throughout American History. While this is true, and to some extent true today, it is unfair for minorities who have been historically discriminated against to have an easier time applying to schools.

    And let me expand on that. A major argument is that minorities should receive preferential treatment because they are poor and cannot compete with the wealthier Caucasian people. But is the case to solely focus on the color of the skin? Rather not! America stands currently as a nation that does not decide by race, but by meritocracy and hard work. If a majority of minority groups are poor and unable to spend for education, they should receive preferential treatment. However, if a Caucasian is poor, he should have a preferential treatment over the rich Caucasian. It should not be a matter of color, but a matter of upbringing.

    And imagine it this way. If a poor Asian or Caucasian, boy or girl, applies to a college after working hard for years self studying, bringing up perfect test scores, and scraped their precious time doing extracurricular activities, they will be rejected for the rich black or Hispanic, who received mediocre test scores at best, received the best education, did one or two clubs, and beat out other of their minorities for a spot in the college of choice. That is the case that Americans currently live today.

    America does not need to abolish Affirmative Action. It does not need to forget about the past. However, they should reconsider the structure of this system. And to you who disagree, consider yourself in a position of applying to a school with no help, from things such as legacies, as an Asian or Caucasian teenager. Will you be upset that the school accepted your black or Hispanic classmate who had the same scores, did the same activities, and studied the same amount of time as you, while you did not?

    Is it fair? I ask you, to those who cannot see. To those minorities, is it just? Do you feel safe for your future that has been safeguarded by the government and colleges? It is hard to understand the sufferings of those under you? But, they must realize that the system is corrupt. It is unfair. It must be changed. While it has no need to be abolished, it must be changed.

  • The current situation is skewed.

    As a country, America has always had an issue with race. African Americans and Native Americans are usually singled out as the most discriminated against throughout American History. While this is true, and to some extent true today, it is unfair for minorities who have been historically discriminated against to have an easier time applying to schools.

    And let me expand on that. A major argument is that minorities should receive preferential treatment because they are poor and cannot compete with the wealthier Caucasian people. But is the case to solely focus on the color of the skin? Rather not! America stands currently as a nation that does not decide by race, but by meritocracy and hard work. If a majority of minority groups are poor and unable to spend for education, they should receive preferential treatment. However, if a Caucasian is poor, he should have a preferential treatment over the rich Caucasian. It should not be a matter of color, but a matter of upbringing.

    And imagine it this way. If a poor Asian or Caucasian, boy or girl, applies to a college after working hard for years self studying, bringing up perfect test scores, and scraped their precious time doing extracurricular activities, they will be rejected for the rich black or Hispanic, who received mediocre test scores at best, received the best education, did one or two clubs, and beat out other of their minorities for a spot in the college of choice. That is the case that Americans currently live today.

    America does not need to abolish Affirmative Action. It does not need to forget about the past. However, they should reconsider the structure of this system. And to you who disagree, consider yourself in a position of applying to a school with no help, from things such as legacies, as an Asian or Caucasian teenager. Will you be upset that the school accepted your black or Hispanic classmate who had the same scores, did the same activities, and studied the same amount of time as you, while you did not?

    Is it fair? I ask you, to those who cannot see. To those minorities, is it just? Do you feel safe for your future that has been safeguarded by the government and colleges? It is hard to understand the sufferings of those under you? But, they must realize that the system is corrupt. It is unfair. It must be changed. While it has no need to be abolished, it must be changed.

  • Affirmative action opens the door for many underprivileged individuals to obtain education

    We as a society cannot ignore the injustice that is racial inequality. While many believe that it is unfair to individuals of the present to pay for the mistakes of the past, affirmative action allows for the closing of the achievement gap. It is not unfair because minority groups need the encouragement of education that is provided by it. Wiltz recently outlined in her 2012 study that on average, African American and Latino high-school seniors perform math and read at the same level as 13-year old white students. Clearly, if we were to get rid of affirmative action, many of these minority race students would lose the opportunity to become intellectuals later in life, since they would always be outmatched in the collegiate process by a white student with more resources. Affirmative action combats the opportunity gap that devours the hopes and dreams of aspiring youths of colour. We need it so that our members of society can break from the vicious cycle of inequality. This way, maybe daunting statistics (like the fact that roughly 70% of people in the low-income category never reach the middle class) can cease to exist. We need quotas in order to give the best students from minority groups their chance to shine. Many of them come from low-income school districts, so they have to fight for their GPA while having less resources. If you ask me, I'd take a 3.8 GPA from someone who lived through the struggle over a 3.9 GPA from someone who had all of the resources at their disposal any day!

  • Affirmative action opens the door for many underprivileged individuals to obtain education

    We as a society cannot ignore the injustice that is racial inequality. While many believe that it is unfair to individuals of the present to pay for the mistakes of the past, affirmative action allows for the closing of the achievement gap. It is not unfair because minority groups need the encouragement of education that is provided by it. Wiltz recently outlined in her 2012 study that on average, African American and Latino high-school seniors perform math and read at the same level as 13-year old white students. Clearly, if we were to get rid of affirmative action, many of these minority race students would lose the opportunity to become intellectuals later in life, since they would always be outmatched in the collegiate process by a white student with more resources. Affirmative action combats the opportunity gap that devours the hopes and dreams of aspiring youths of colour. We need it so that our members of society can break from the vicious cycle of inequality. This way, maybe daunting statistics (like the fact that roughly 70% of people in the low-income category never reach the middle class) can cease to exist. We need quotas in order to give the best students from minority groups their chance to shine. Many of them come from low-income school districts, so they have to fight for their GPA while having less resources. If you ask me, I'd take a 3.8 GPA from someone who lived through the struggle over a 3.9 GPA from someone who had all of the resources at their disposal any day!

  • It's not unfair it's just past it's time

    I believe affirmative action was a good thing in it's heyday but that time has long sense past.

    We need to make sure everyone is given a fair shake getting into college or in the workplace but it might time for affirmative action to be phased out and replaced but more modern ways of checking and balancing the system.


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