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  • Yes, something can be new.

    Anything can be new in regards to the meaning to the word. While something may be old to somebody, to somebody who has never been exposed to a source or an object, it can still be new. The idea of new is not a definite rule, it's a belief that is based on experience.

  • Yes, some things are completely new

    When you purchase a product, it is often regarded as new. Sometimes, those products can be already slightly used but packaged as new. But this does not mean that everything is like that. Many things in the world have been created as new from old materials that have been recycled.

  • Ever Completely New

    I personally think that The Opportunity Rover, which is trundling happily around Mars, has spotted a distinctive streak of rock breaking through the surface of the red planet.
    While scouting around for a spot to sit through during the chilly Martian winter, Opportunity's handlers noticed a bright vein of light-colored minerals on the edge of the Endeavor crater, on a bit of raised ground named Cape York.

  • No, because everything takes parts.

    Everything is usually tested beforehand to make sure it works properly. The parts required to make things are usually used, which makes no sense because they combine to make a new product? The only thing that is new is natural, but we cannot place nature in a marketplace of material culture.

  • anything ever completely new

    I personally disagree.The Opportunity Rover, which is trundling happily around Mars, has spotted a distinctive streak of rock breaking through the surface of the red planet.
    While scouting around for a spot to sit through during the chilly Martian winter, Opportunity's handlers noticed a bright vein of light-coloured minerals on the edge of the Endeavour crater, on a bit of raised ground named Cape York.
    It's thought that the rocks could be phyllosilicates -- minerals that form in a watery environment. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has already spotted phyllosilicates -- in this case, smectites made of iron- and magnesium-rich clays -- from orbit, but hasn't been able to sample them to check for sure.
    Steve Squyres, Mars Exploration Rover principal investigator at Cornell University, said: "This is a real triumph of geology. We saw these veins as we crossed from the Meridiani plains into the Noachian terrain back in August. We've kept those in mind as a very important thing we wanted to look at, but we were so focused on getting into the Noachian and new terrain that we made that the highest priority, figuring that we would get the veins later."


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