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  • Sanders momentum appears to have stalled

    Bernie Sanders momentum against Hillary Clinton appears to have stalled. Although he was way behind in the polls initially, he did not build on his big win in New Hampshire. In fact, he lost Nevada. The primary now moves to more moderate states in the south, which should play into Clinton's strength.

  • He had a good moment, but that's it

    Bernie Sanders had a great time in New Hampshire, and has by all means surpassed expectations. However, I don't believe he is gaining any momentum. Most polls have Hillary winning the nomination by a landslide, and the super delegates will make sure of it. Bernie has no chance, and I think more and more people are starting to realize this.

  • The Nevada primary was a bad sign for Sanders.

    Clinton is an unabashed political realist and trusted by many as a safe pair of hands who would make difficult decisions when they are needed. This essentially puts her in the status quo camp which gives the advantage. When pressed, a majority will vote for the status quo unless they find their situation truly intolerable.

    Sanders, by contrast is an idealist. In order to prevail against Clinton he must inspire a huge surge of political involvement from the electorate including those who are often liable not to vote at all, as President Obama did in 2008. Unfortunately for him, he has not inspired the same sea change. The poor showing in Nevada evidences this. As things stand he has not done enough to challenge Clinton.

  • Looks like the momentum has peaked.

    Ask me this question even five days ago, and I would have said yes. However, the Bernie Sanders platform is based on people coming together, turning out and voting to make change happen. The problem is, the turnout is down. The people are not showing up. Without the numbers to back up his claims, Bernie's rhetoric is starting to fall flat. His consistent drumbeat on the same issues is getting stale. Some of it is understandable because staying on message has been a powerful political ploy. But he leaves voters with a lot of unanswered questions.


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