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Is breeding pedigree dogs just eugenics by another name?

Asked by: hannahd91
  • How is selective breeding still acceptable practice for dogs? (but not humans)

    Eugenics is a dirty word which most sane, morally upright people have long dispensed with. No one is better or worse than anyone else and thankfully, ideas of 'blood purity' and superficial distinctions that once rendered one race superior to another have long been void of support. Yet, we still continue to breed pedigree dogs and very often shun crossbreeds for being lesser dogs. We breed for function over form, simply to maintain breed purity, and ignore all the problems (health and otherwise) that come with this. We breed for 'superior' qualities and have been known to cull dogs that don't conform to these. How is this not eugenics? And how is it still acceptable?

  • Actually Selective breeding of dogs predates our modern concept of eugenics:

    How do you imagine animals became domesticated? Through generations of selective breeding, weeding out undesirable traits.

    In the case of dogs the many breeds we have today are descended from wolves, they were selectively bred to get rid of traits humans considered bad/un-beneficial.

    For example reducing the aggression of dogs compared to that of their wolf ancestors, making it easier to tame/train them.

    The dogs were one of the first animals humans domesticated and over thousands of years of selective breeding we now have many different dog breeds for varying reasons.

    There are hundreds of different dog breeds, many of which were bred for specific purposes, from herding sheep, protecting herds of domesticated live stock, bred for guarding property, military purposes, hunting, drug detection, seeing eye dogs, racing, etc....

    Then again there were many bred for superficial reasons, either to make them look good be better pets, certain colours or sizes etc....

    Plenty of other animals were later selectively bred:

    -Cattle for increased meat and milk production, to the extent that modern dairy cattle would not be able to survive without being regularly milked.

    -Sheep for varying forms and quantities of wool production, meat production.

    -Horses for increased speed, carrying/pulling capacity, differing sizes for different roles.

    Even most domesticated plants were selectively bred from food crops, wine/table grapes, citrus, vegetables etc...

    If anything eugenics is just a specific name for the selective breeding of Humans to distinguish it from the selective breeding of animals and plants.

    How do you imagine animals became domesticated? Through generations of selective breeding, weeding out undesirable traits.

    In the case of dogs the many breeds we have today are descended from wolves, they were selectively bred to get rid of traits humans considered bad/un-beneficial.

    For example reducing the aggression of dogs compared to that of their wolf ancestors, making it easier to tame/train them.

    The dogs were one of the first animals humans domesticated and over thousands of years of selective breeding we now have many different dog breeds for varying reasons.

    There are hundreds of different dog breeds, many of which were bred for specific purposes, from herding sheep, protecting herds of domesticated live stock, bred for guarding property, military purposes, hunting, drug detection, seeing eye dogs, racing, etc....

    Then again there were many bred for superficial reasons, either to make them look good be better pets, certain colours or sizes etc....

    If anything eugenics is just a specific name for the selective breeding of Humans to distinguish it from the other forms of selective breeding of animals and plants.

    Since when the term was thought up people were still in denial when it came to admitting Humans were animals.

    Eugenics:

    "doctrine of progress in evolution of the human race, race-culture," 1883, coined (along with adjective eugenic) by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) on analogy of ethics, physics, etc. from Greek eugenes "well-born, of good stock, of noble race," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + genos "birth" (see genus).


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