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  • Yes it is!

    In my side, I definitely argue that capitalism is an anti-christ. I am a sociology student and capitalism for me is a system of economic by which owner exploit laborer for the high profit, yet paying unfairly. They honor business above all. By which in contradict with what god say do not make any idle on this earth. With this fact, we could say that capitalism is in contradict in god's nature.

  • Yes it is!

    In my side, I definitely argue that capitalism is an anti-christ. I am a sociology student and capitalism for me is a system of economic by which owner exploit laborer for the high profit, yet paying unfairly. They honor business above all. By which in contradict with what god say do not make any idle on this earth. With this fact, we could say that capitalism is in contradict in god's nature.

  • It's simply impossible .

    There was never the intention of turning the Garden into a FOR SALE lot ! That we need to trade goods and services in a fallen world goes without saying ; however, it's not possible to meet gods standard for our survival under the capitalist system, especially the latest incarnation - global neoliberal capitalism- which is the precursor to the age of anti-christ . Christian's who use scripture to argue for capitalism suffer from a mighty delusion .

  • It is a contradiction

    Capitalism is not a bad thing. It has great potential for rapid economic growth and individual initiative. But a good Capitalist economy relies on greed.

    In Capitalism, unemployment rises and the economy fails when consumers stop purchasing material things. The desire for material possessions is called greed, so Capitalism survives on the greed of the people. Greed is a sin.

    The goal of Capitalism is the accumulation of wealth. The goal of Christianity is the riddance of it.

    Deuteronomy 23:19
    -Do not charge your brother interest, whether on money or food or anything else that may earn interest.
    (So no profit. Christianity does not allow people to make a profit, and Capitalism emphasizes individual profit.)

    Matthew 6:24
    -You cannot serve both God and money.
    (A Christian cannot seek fortune and serve God. He or she cannot attempt to achieve the ultimate goal of Capitalism: wealth.)

    Matthew 21:12-13
    -Jesus entered the temple area and drove out all who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves. "It is written," he said to them, " 'My house will be called a house of prayer,' but you are making it a 'den of robbers.' "
    (The one time Jesus got angry was when people thought they could mix profit and religion. A Christian cannot do both at the same time.)

    My Conservative Christian friends, whom I love and respect dearly, defend Capitalism very hardily. It is because they love money and they love God. They want both and try to make cases that the two can mix. That is not present in the bible. Far beyond what I have stated, the bible repeatedly separates the desire for money and the desire for faith.

  • It is contradiction

    Capitalism is not a bad thing, but it relies on greed. If consumers stop consuming then the market fails and unemployment rises. The desire for material possessions is called greed which is a sin. Without greed a Capitalist economy sinks.

    The goal of Capitalism is the accumulation of wealth. The goal of Christianity is the riddance of it.

    Deuteronomy 23:19
    -Do not charge your brother interest, whether on money or food or anything else that may earn interest.
    (So no profit at all. The goal is to break even. Capitalism does not survive under that circumstance since the goal is to make profit.)

    Matthew 6:24
    -You cannot serve both God and money.
    (The two factors of piety and money are separate. Trying to make money for yourself means you cannot serve God therefore no Capitalist culture can serve God.)

    Matthew 21:12-13
    -Jesus entered the temple area and drove out all who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves. "It is written," he said to them, " 'My house will be called a house of prayer,' but you are making it a 'den of robbers.' "

  • Depending how it is applied.

    Jesus Christ constantly talked about taking care of the poor. He even told a rich man to sell all that he had and give it to the poor and come follow him. Jesus also said it is harder for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven than it was to thread a camel through the eye of a needle. Most capitalist love their money more than they love anything or anyone. It is the love of money that is the root of all evil. Having money and fine things is not a bad thing unless it is your obsession to have more and more and more. If you honor God first and then help the poor there isn't anything wrong with living in a capitalist system. It's greed that ruins capitalism.

  • Indeed, it is.

    The Tenth Commandment reads, "You shall not covet your neighbor's house. You shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or his manservant or maidservant, his ox or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor."

    That's an express injunction against covetousness, but covetousness is the impetus of capitalism.

    Note that I'm really just playing devil's advocate to piss of Christian conservatives!

  • You Bet!

    Yes, capitalism is anti-Christian. Capitalism is ownership of businesses and the accumulation of wealth. For a businessman to have a successful business, he must promote his product above all else, or fail. If his business becomes successful, the owner must constantly look for ways to be more profitable, less wasteful, and pay wages no higher than he absolutely must. This is where Christian values butt heads with Capitalism – business owners are not looking to redeem their souls and do right by their fellow man – they are looking to pay a dividend and keep the board of directors rich and happy.

  • No.

    For it to be 'anti-Christian', it would have to be opposed to the practicing of Christianity, which it isn't really. Despite that, Acts 4:32 says 'And the multitude of believers had but one heart and one soul: neither did any one say that aught of the things which he possessed, was his own; but all things were common unto them.', so yeah.

  • Not exactly

    Christianity has a founding principal of treating others kindly and sharing and taking care of one another. capitalism taken to its logical extremes produces greed, materialistic want, and corruption. But that is the cancerous part of teh end result - capitalism at its core is just business, buying and selling and producing and consuming. Wether it be barter or stocks and bonds, it is just business, which is in no way religious. If done with morality, capitalism need never be an evil.

  • No Capitalism Is Not Anti-Christian

    Capitalism does have some aspects which may be considered to be anti-Christian, but so too does just about everything else in this world. There is no valid reason why a Christian God fearing person cannot go about their business within a capitalist system while maintaining the rules of Christianity. If a person should happen to "backslide" during their exploits in capitalism, so be it. No one will ever be a perfect Christian, and to expect anything more would be entirely ridiculous.

  • No, capitalism is not anti-Christian

    In and of itself, capitalism is not anti-Christian. If a company is run morally, ethically and legally, they are providing hopefully good jobs to allow people to earn a living. In addition, it also allows the owners to donate some funds to charitable groups, along with providing a possibly valuable item or service to the community.

  • Obviously not at all!

    Capitalism is a truly fair play. Unfortunately, there are still some people who think that the rich is greedy while in fact the rich simply works harder. If you don't work, you don't get to eat. If you work harder, you gain a lot more than those who don't. As simple as that.


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