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  • Everyone deserves healthcare, but there are limits.

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.

  • Should it be a privilege?

    I'm not sure - personally I believe that being made to pay for certain treatments could persuade people to change their ways and stop harming their health. For example, a smoker could be persuaded to reduce or even stop their habit, if it was going to cost them more with added health costs.

  • Healthcare is a Right, Not Privilege

    No, healthcare is not a privilege but a right. The US Declaration of Independence lists three inalienable rights; life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Within the idea of "life" comes health and thriving, thus healthcare is a right. To deny healthcare is to impede on the right to life.

  • All citizens have a right to healthcare.

    Healthcare should not be a privilege reserved only for those who can afford it. All people are humans, and humans are imperfect beings. Everyone is subjective to illness, and people should not be punished or denied help when they get sick just because they cannot afford to pay for it. As civil human beings, we should wish our fellow man well enough to want to insure that everyone has access to healthcare.

  • We simply can't give please healthcare away

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.

  • There is a limit to what we can give

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.

  • Everyone deserves healthcare, but there are limits.

    Healthcare is a right, to an extent. It is in the public's interest to provide public healthcare as a right...Up to a point. We must admit, however, that it is economically impossible to give the best care to all. If ALL healthcare is provided free of charge, then there is no value attached to such care despite there being significant cost. Healthcare is a limited resource and when you mix a limited supply with an unlimited demand, you are asking for trouble. Thus, we must attach a cost to services above the most basic of care or we risk having nothing above the most basic of care due to the collapse of such services.

    I will use medication development as an example. PHARMA is an awful racket in many cases, but out of that racket we see amazing medical leaps from time to time due to the profit motive. One example is the development of new Hepatitis medications in recent years. These medications have lifted cure rates from the 50th percentile to the 95th percentile overnight. These types of leaps cost billions of dollars per medication brought to market. Most medications barely break even. When a major leap is achieved, these medications are priced high because they have a limited time under patent. They must earn that money back and cover the cost of all the failures or non-approved medications. After patent expiration, generics can be released and prices slowly begin to drop as competition increases. Thus, patients pay exorbitant prices for around 10 to 15 years and after this time period, prices generally drop dramatically. If companies are unable to earn a profit or break even,the entire system breaks down and these inexpensive generics never exist. People do not have a right to these medications because these medications were developed as a result of the profit motive and giving them away for free would cause a breakdown of this system and development would cease. The only replacement would be government development, which would be slower and less innovative.


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