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Is it ethical to steal money from a person if you need it to pay rent and they are going to use it on alcohol?

Asked by: Jelliminelli
  • It is ethical

    This is ethical because someone needs it on means to survive while the other person just needs it for booze. More likely than not, with the rates of drunk drivers, the person will probably commit wrongfully actions anyways with the alcohol. At least if the person gets the money it will give them a place to live for one more month instead of being out in the cold probably freezing to death. Times are hard now.

  • Are You Kidding Me?!

    Of course it is! If they are just going to spend the money on alcohol then boom! TAKE IT! Who cares if it is ethical or not! It is free money! Who doesn't like free money! There are not too many factors too consider! Don't listen to JordanTWeiner, MettaWorldPeace, and deacc, they don't understand the defintion of ethical.

    JDogMoney Out

    And You're Welcome

  • Necessity over excess

    It is necessary for you to pay rent, otherwise you could lose your house/apartment/room or wherever you are paying rent to live. I think that it would be better to get the appropriate money in a more ethical way, but if that cannot be done it is fine to get money through those who don't need it.

    Alcohol on the other hand is excessive spending of money. You don't need alcohol to survive. If you are using money only for necessities, then I think that it shouldn't be stolen, but if you are going to use it for things you don't need, then you should be willing to accept that there are people who need it more than you.

  • It's a slippery slope argument.

    You may as well say that it's ethical to steal money from millionaires who spend their money on booze and women or would gamble their money away anyway. Just because someone needs money more doesn't mean it's ethical for them to commit the crime of stealing to satisfy their needs n hence lead to "more happiness". Yeah, it's an unfair world but the rights of the people with the money must be protected as well. They must maintain their right to be able to spend it in whatever way they can because it's THEIR property. Would you approve of someone stealing all your money just because they need it justificably more than you (let's say he stole it for the starving children in undeveloped countries - a modern day Robin Hood)? I don't think so.

  • More needs to be considered, but most likely, no:

    More questions need to be asked before someone can 'ethically' justify something. (I believe people, especially in the 'yes' column, are confusing ethical with moral) First, why are you (or whomever) having to steal in the first place? Rent is nearly the most important (1st) payment to make, so where else was money/time spent otherwise? (computer? Phone? Internet? Debate.Org membership ;) Second, how does/would one know that the money stolen is earmarked for alcohol? Just because someone does buy/drink, doesn't mean the money one steals is specifically for that. Money's purpose is irrespective of one's purchases, therefore, the $5 one takes could practically be or not be attributed to anything someone will/intend to buy, ever. Third, ASSUMING that this money somehow magically is ONLY used to buy alcohol (like a coupon or something), who makes the decision to say that a person's earnings from the sweat of their brown is subject to 'ethical' seizure from another more 'desperate' person in a 'desperate' situation. Just because I make $xxx.Xx a week doesn't mean that a person making half of that should be either legally entitled or ethically subject to a 'fair' robbery. I'm going to go out on a limb here and make a judgment call on this 'you' person and tell them this: Ethics can both explain and confuse many decisions, however, in this case, the writing is on the wall; you (or whomever) are trying to justify an act that you know is wrong by 'ethically' justifying it, and reaching out for social approval online.

  • Stealing is stealing.

    You are committing a crime by stealing someone else's money. So what if they are going to use it alcohol? Example: I am going to have a party next weekend. I need to buy alcohol for the party. Does that give you the right to take my money? No, absolutely not. It is not your money to take. Simple as that.

  • It is not your money to take.

    First of all how do you know for an absolute fact that the money is going to be spent on alcohol? You don't. Unless you can see in to the future then their is no way you could possibly know. Plus if you need to pay the rent that badly maybe instead of going straight to a life of crime you should consider other options. Such as a cheaper house/apartment, a second job, taking out a loan, borrowing money from a friend or family member. Seriously, their is no way your situation is as bad as you think it is if your resorting to stealing. Plus it's not your money to take. What it's being spent on doesn't matter because it's not your money.

  • Nope. Not Ethical

    The fact that they will spend the money on booze is irrelevant to the situation. If they have earned the money, it's theirs and they can choose to do what ever they want with it. You taking it from them would just be stealing and that's wrong. Simple as that.

  • Stealing is wrong and misusing of stealth money is more wrong

    This is unethical because the person who needs money for rent either doesn't have a job, didn't plan their income well enough, didn't work enough to pay rent, or they themselves got money stolen from them. Aside from the possibility of them being a victim of theft, these are mostly unfortunate faults of the person who needs the money for rent. The person who is purchasing the alcohol isn't necessarily doing anything wrong. They are either using money that was lent to them, earned by them, or stolen by them. Neither of these make the act justifiable for the other person though. Even if the person purchasing the alcohol stole money for it, that doesn't make it anymore right. That would just make their purchase of the alcohol wrong. It is not your money. So if you steal it, you are committing a crime. For the person using it for alcohol. As long as the person earned that money, it is their prerogative on how to spend the money. If you don't have enough money to cover rent, then you need to re-evaluate your expenses as you are spending more than you earn.

  • Stealing is wrong and misusing of steal money is more wrong

    This is unethical because the person who needs money for rent either doesn't have a job, didn't plan their income well enough, didn't work enough to pay rent, or they themselves got money stolen from them. Aside from the possibility of them being a victim of theft, these are mostly unfortunate faults of the person who needs the money for rent. The person who is purchasing the alcohol isn't necessarily doing anything wrong. They are either using money that was lent to them, earned by them, or stolen by them. Neither of these make the act justifiable for the other person though. Even if the person purchasing the alcohol stole money for it, that doesn't make it anymore right. That would just make their purchase of the alcohol wrong. It is not your money. So if you steal it, you are committing a crime. For the person using it for alcohol. As long as the person earned that money, it is their prerogative on how to spend the money. If you don't have enough money to cover rent, then you need to re-evaluate your expenses as you are spending more than you earn.

  • Definitely not ethical.

    It is not your money. So if you steal it, you are committing a crime. For the person using it for alcohol. As long as the person earned that money, it is their prerogative on how to spend the money.

    If you don't have enough money to cover rent, then you need to re-evaluate your expenses as you are spending more than you earn.

  • Wrong is wrong

    Don't get me wrong, if a person took a loaf of bread from me I'd most likely forgive them (and by the way that's a lot of alcohol). But wrong is wrong--I don't think I would ever steal from someone else for any reason. I might ask someone for help, but I would not take unjustly. There is definately a comfort in knowing (my money is safe). I may try to convince the person to stop drinking for his own sake, but I would not force him to. It is not my money and by trying to take something not freely given I would only be creating problems.


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Vere_Mendacium says2014-12-09T05:33:56.520
This in no way has anything to do with you, right?