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  • No, bailout money should not be for bonuses.

    I think that bailout money should only be used to the things that are needed, such as keeping the business in the black. If you give the money to bonuses then you are not actually saving the business. People need to be awarded, but generally those bonuses go to executives who do not actually deserve the money.

  • Bailout money should be used for just that purpose not bonuses.

    If bailouts were bonuses the names would be changed to bonuses. It's ridiculous to say "hey were getting bailed out by the government. By the way your getting your bonus this week too." If a company is still issuing bonuses, they have some serious financial reorganization needed. If a company is getting bailed out, the government should be auditing their records, checking for this kind of financial irresposibility.

  • No, it's not fair to use bailout money for bonuses.

    I do not think it is fair to used bailout money for bonuses. When a company or business is bailed out by the government, it is because that company or business has failed as an enterprise to be successful. Taxpayer money should not be used to give people who failed at their jobs bonuses.

  • No, that's awful

    Bailout money wasn't handed out so people on the top of the company could pat each other on the back for how good a job they did, but that's how it got used in more than one scenario. It's unbelievably arrogant and slimy behavior but there was really nothing in place to prevent it once the money was granted.

  • No, bailout money should not be used for bonuses.

    If a business is in trouble and receives bailout money from the government, the money should only be used for necessary things within the business. Giving a bonus to a CEO, as an example, is definitely not necessary. In fact, the CEO will have proven himself to be a poor employee and, if anything, should be let go, not given a bonus. Taxpayers are definitely not responsible for handing out bonuses to poorly performing businesses.

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