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Is it possible for us to interact and see an atom in the future?

Asked by: lyricaleopard
  • I believe yes

    With the improving technology of this day and age we are increasing in intellect power and man power allowing us to change and inovate the technology we have today. With this growing intellect, I mean people in terkey have already made a prototype transformer from the movie and have almost perfected it. With this fast space in changing technlogy we really are getting closer to changing what we can do with the building blocks of the universe.

  • The Technology Already Exists

    Atoms range in size from a few nanometers to hundreds of nanometers and you can already see even individual hydrogen atoms under a microscope. However, quanta have been called "formless" due to the Heisenberg Indeterminacy Principle and are contextual, meaning, they take on whatever shapes and properties the specific context will allow and can even occupy two places simultaneously.

  • By the nature of atoms seeing in the sense of light them is impossible.

    An atom is much smaller than the wavelength of the visible spectrum. It starts just bellow 400 nanometres but the largest nuclear radius of any atom is Cesium at about 270 picometers i.e. about a quarter of a nanometre. Therefor we will never be able to see them in the sense of physically looking at them. We can however observe them and their constituent parts in a number of ways. You can observe the magnetic fields, their mass, and how they interact with various objects. On the subject of interacting with atoms we do that all the time. We split atoms in fission, we combine atoms in fusion, we ionise them all the time. We can change their element without changing their weight in electron capture. Also to rely to the creators comment atoms aren't the building blocks to the universe, they aren't even close. Atoms are made up of protons and neutrons which are made up of quarks as well as electrons which are leptons and therefor as far as we know indivisible. Plus you have all the interaction particles such as gluons that are constantly in a nucleus and string theory brings in a whole can of worms that I can't fit into this box.

  • We will never see an atom in the sense of light.

    An atom is much smaller than the wavelength of the visible spectrum. It starts just bellow 400 nanometres but the largest nuclear radius of any atom is Cesium at about 270 picometers i.e. about a quarter of a nanometre. Therefor we will never be able to see them in the sense of physically looking at them. We can however observe them and their constituent parts in a number of ways. You can observe the magnetic fields, their mass, and how they interact with various objects. On the subject of interacting with atoms we do that all the time. We split atoms in fission, we combine atoms in fusion, we ionise them all the time. We can change their element without changing their weight in electron capture and do hundreds of other things to atoms.


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