• I'm afraid not, Evolution is proven religion is not

    While I understand anger about this subject, evolution is proven without a doubt, religion is in large part a belief/opinion and forcing kids to learn about it goes directly against the first amendment. The two are not the same is my position, your arguing we should not teach a basic truth of science setting our country further back in Science. It would be a pity to see the ignorance that would result. I believe that teaching kids religion forcibly is unconstitutional.

  • What is up with the argument here?

    People are arguing that evolutions shouldn't be taught because christianity isn't taught. I'm sorry, but since when was evolution a religious belief? That's right, it's not. It's proven fact. Knowing about the existence of evolution doesn't make you an atheist. It makes you smart. Any christian student can learn evolution and still follow their religion.

  • Evolution is proven. Religion is not. Simple as that. Why do religious people try to deny it?

    The headline says it all. Religion is just a belief. Evolution ACTUALLY happened. There is ACTUAL evidence. Let the kids be religious if they feel like it. But don't try to cover up an actual event of history. Sure religious people can deny this amd say "No, religion is real!" I don't see any solid evidence. Its like comitting a crime. Police can't just arrest someone because they "feel it". They need evidence. Kids should know history.

  • The teachings of schools are based in science.

    There are two types of evolution.

    1- Evolution as the modifications of living organisms through time, which has been proved true, as can be seen in bacteria in a short period of time.
    2- Theory of evolution as the explanation of how these modifications have succeeded.

    Evolution is a scientific theory which has been collecting evidences through the years to support it, and each day is approaching even more to be proved true.

  • It's the best theory

    Evolution, as opposed to creationism/intelligent design, is the best proven theory to date that we have about how life forms. Evolution doesn't even try to prove how the first life got here, nor does it dwell on whether or not God exists. Evolution has been proven by fossils and expirementation while Creationism has no facts to support it except for some mis-translated books that say things that are not documented at all by any other texts. You cannot just put whatever you want in schools because of your personal unfounded beliefs. You saw what happened with the Spagetti Monster.

  • Yes it is correct.

    It is correct to give children a choice of what they want to believe, if they choose to believe R.E over science, Yet if a child decides to believe science over RE they have a right to do so. Restating if they want to believe God created the earth that is their choice, but if they want to believe that the earth was created by the big bang. Adam and Eve? Or evolution it is your choice, it is not up to the school to decide what a child will believe

  • It's purely scientific

    Let me begin with the fact that we have separation of church and state in America. Educators with religious convictions are therefore not allowed to influence the lessons mandated by the state with religious overtones. Completely avoiding a valid and scientific study is doing just that, and the students will suffer.

  • Science is not religion

    There are many many religions in this world, thousands. To teach them all would be impossible and useless. Science on the otherhand, has predominantly one main accepted theory at a time, as seen in the theory of evolution. If one will deprive children from a scientific theory like evolution, they might as well just deprive them of chemistry or physics. Religion and Science are slowly growing further and further apart and Science is making more and more sense as our knowledge of it is increasing,

  • Of course it is.

    Evolution is a theory that has a lot of scientific evidence to support it. The knowledge of help people understand how life works and appreciate all the things that life can do. Teaching evolution is like teaching physics, chemistry, or math.

    If this question was meant for the religious people, then understand this: Public schools are constitutionally mandated to teach knowledge, not faith.

  • It is wrong to teach creationism.

    Evolution is a proven theory. There is no viable alternative. It should be illegal for any school to teach pupils what is demonstrably nonsense without showing why it is nonsense, and the very good reasons why anyone believing such nonsense is irrational at the best, and delusional as the worst.

  • Of course not!

    If we cannot teach Christianity or basically any other belief in schools, then why is evolution so special? A lot of people don't believe in it, and for it to be shoved down their throats every day is absolutely ridiculous. It doesn't matter if it's the "best current theory" or not, it is still a theory. Not proven, not a fact, and should not be taught in schools.

  • Just maybe evolution...

    Is a religion itself? Wait, wait. I know how this sounds.

    This may sound like the beginning of a suchy-feely, good-intentioned religious response; however, I want to examine with mindset of our country-- church SEPARATE from state. Here's an unbiased, general understanding:

    Religion: a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe...

    According the typical online dictionary, this is the definition of what a facts-only, non-religious, American public school would naturally avoid.
    Most often this definition is tied with a supernatural, intangible deity. However, it technically describes any philosophy that holds "beliefs" within its central understanding of our world. Of course, schools are constitutionally technical.
    So recap: Underneath science, facts, personal experiences and understanding, a religion includes a foundation of beliefs. Agreed? Evolution is generally regarded as the scientific, logical perspective of the "cause, nature, and purpose of the universe". Its ideals are perfect for our country which was based on freedoms, significantly the freedom of religion! America would obviously want her public schools to honor her foundation principle!

    But, there is one ever-so-slight, easily-overlooked detail: evolution is founded on beliefs too.

    Evolution, by principle, is entirely scientific-- it can be studied, researched, and verified with experiments. Of course, we are limited to only observing evolution on a micro-scale. Macro-evolution is purely assumed. Within these assumptions are many aspects that lack proper reason and truth.
    A bird has never developed the makeup of anything but a bird. No reptilian tendencies have ever been observed in a bird. We cannot scientifically explain how a bird can become a reptile.
    A marine organism could not develop into a land-dwelling organism without evolving MAJORLY within one generation (for example: it would need land-worthy respiratory system, means of stability and possible movement, etc, all at once in order to survive.) Evolutionists must BELIEVE that this could be possible.
    Oh, and don't mention HOW the basic materials of the universe were produced (there are too many theories for that)...

    The only difference? Unlike many religions, evolution doesn't use books, historical evidence, moral practices, or personal experiences as proof... It manipulates science to back it up.

    (For those who would argue that science isn't "manipulated" but naturally supports evolution, we can discover information to prove practically anything we want it to. This entire site proves that two fundamentally different thoughts can be equally supported with the right combinations of facts and knowledge.)

    Bottom line: evolution is a religion. At its core it holds beliefs, a sponsor of all religions. Albeit evolution holds many scientific truths, does the seemingly best-proven religion automatically disqualify itself from the limits of religion within a church-separated state? Seems a bit unconstitutional.

    Prohibit religious teaching. Ban evolution.

  • People can not teach christiantiy in school

    Evolution is an idea that people feel really deeply about. Just like religion. So if we can not teach one belief in school why can we teach another? It is a double slandered. You might say oh well it is proven that evolution is real. But Religion can be just as proven.

  • God is more than evolution

    Evolution is a demonic opinion that should not have to be taught in schools. Students who are religious or who have a are religious background should not have to endure listening to things that are against their faith. Even some of the teachers who have to teach evolution don't believe in it.

  • Evolution dogma preaches we evolved from bacteria. That is a faith based religious fairy tale taught by evil people enforced by corrupt courts and governments.

    Biogenesis refutes evolution from the starting point. Teaching evolution is not proving evolution . It is not taught in history class. Teachers should not be teaching it in science class. Student are not presented with credible evidence for evolution from bacteria. They are expected to just believe it on faith . No student can prove evolution. Adaption and variation is not evolution.

  • It's against my religion.

    I'm not saying we have to go out and teach religion in out schools, but like these other people said, it can be just as proved. I want evidence that evolution is real. Just don't tell me my religion is wrong and that I can't spread word to people about Jesus. That's what I learned, so I don't see a problem with that. I was told to go out and teach people about Jesus. Hate me or don't hate me, I do not care. I shouldn't, nor should my children have to go through lessons about evolution and how we came from Chimps and Gorillas when that is going against every thing I learn in church. Especially if they practically preach it to the class and how they think it's the way to go.

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