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  • Yes: Read the topic

    The topic is "presumed consent" which implies an opt-out system. All of the arguments of the negative side is about their "free will" and THEIR body/organs. There is still an option to opt-out, and if you're not a lazy bum, then you can easily sign something to say that you want your organs to yourself. So with an option to say no, you can't disagree because you DO have an option to say no.

  • Too many people need organs. Too few are willing to donate.

    Most of the population simply "forget" to opt-in to become an organ donor. Currently, 65-90% of the UK population are in favour of organ donation, but only 25% are registered donors. This means about 45% of the population are willing to donate, but do not and so their organs are wasted. http://www.odt.nhs.uk/pdf/the-potential-impact-of-an-opt-out-system-for-organ-donation-in-the-UK.pdf

  • You still get your choice...

    It has been confirmed the #1 main reason people do not donate is because it is a complicated question about whether or not they they should. When someone is asked the question and don't know the answer (or don't care) they will simply go with a non-answer answer. This is by default a choice to say no to donation. Mandated opt out simply changes the default answer.

    With Opt-Out they are forced to decide to opt out rather than opt out by default. No choice is taken away from anyone.

    WHILE EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT TO DECIDE WHAT HAPPENS TO THEIR ORGANS AFTER THEY DIE... IT DOESN'T FOLLOW THAT THEY SHOULD BE ABLE TO AVOID MAKING A DECISION.
    (Especially when lives are the cost of a non-decision).

    By knowing what will happen without action, they choose to allow the donation by doing nothing or make the choice to not donate by opting out.

  • Yes - lives are at stake

    Too many people are stuck on waiting lists, or even denied outright because they aren't the 'ideal' candidate. Many people (like me, I'm ashamed to say) aren't listed as organ donors because they're too lazy and haven't bothered.

    "Over 100,000 Americans are on the waiting list in need of an organ. This crisis within the United States is growing rapidly because on average there are only 30,000 transplants performed each year. More than 6,000 people die each year from lack of a donor organ, an average of 19 people a day." http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/Organ_donation#United_States

    "For example, Germany, which uses an opt-in system, has an organ donation consent rate of 12% among its population, while Austria, a country with a very similar culture and economic development, but which uses an opt-out system, has a consent rate of 99.98%." http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/Organ_donation#Opt-in_vs._opt-out

  • Organ donation saves lives. Multiple lives.

    If there is an opt-out plan and not an opt-in plan for organ donation, the system would work much better. Patients who require organs for things like heart, lung, kidney and liver transplants don't always have enough time to wait around until someone can come along and help, and not every is a viable match to them to donate a piece of their liver or a kidney.

    If organ donation was a presumed consent option, more lives would be saved because there would be a better chance for people to recover. Sometimes, patients end up in cases where they are considered brain dead. This sometimes leads to them donating their organs and saving multiple lives while still having the ability to be properly buried or cremated so their family can get closure. If the patient is not an organ donor and their family agrees not to allow them to be donated, then whey they die, their organs die with them. Seriously, is the corpse going to use their organs? I don't think so.

  • Very simply put, organ donation saves lives.

    As far as I understand it, organ donation is consistent with the beliefs of most major religions and, besides, if people feel very strongly about it, they have the option to opt out. Not only does organ donation save lives, gives people a chance at a better life, but it also can be helpful to scientific/medical research.

    The facts are that there are far too many people on waiting lists with little prospect of finding a suitable donor and that many viable organs are going to waste, it just doesn't make sense.

    Http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/organ-donation/FL00077
    http://www.Nhs.Uk/Conditions/Organ-donation/Pages/Introduction.Aspx

  • No, we should not

    I may be an organ doner myself, however this does not mean that someone else wishes to be. We are individual people our bodies belonging to ourselves. If I wish to donate my organs upon my death, that is my decision. If I want my body buried in a cemetary, or cremated with my ashes spread about a baseball field, this also is my decision. I want doctors to be focused on saving my life, not on keeping my organs healthy for harvesting. With the breaking technology of 3D printers, perhaps organ donation will soon be a thing of the past.

  • It's MY decision

    I think it all depends on how many organs are going to be presumed to be taken for "donation" and what they are going to be used for. If it is to be used for helping someone else live maybe but definitely not without consent for research purposes.

    If a person is brain dead their family should still be allowed to decided whether or not they want their loved ones organs auctioned off to people. Myself, I have a donation card that is in my wallet which says which organs I am willing to donate.

    I also think with presumed consent-- more time and effort is going to be put into taking out the organs wanting to be used, then tested etc, wasted time and money where if they were to talk to the family they will be told if that person has an illness (cancer, hepatitis, AIDS/HIV etc).

  • Most certainly not!

    My organs are MY organs. It is up to me to decide what happens to the when I die. To use an opt-out system and automatically assume i want to give them up is morally wrong.
    If it was automatically assumed that every body wants to donate £10 a month to UNICEF I'm sure the story would be totally different. This would be considered incredibly "cheeky" and rude.
    It's not that I'm against organ donation, but if my organs are to be used it is only right that the NHS have my express permission first.
    This is purely a matter of principal.


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