• Yes it does matter

    See it matters how you dress up a lot , when you go to a marriage or any function you wear ethnic and your body language changes with the traditional outfit and when going for an interview in formals your body language is something else totally different your mind set too .
    Folks you would have definitely seen dance performances , why do they wear their costumes and why not the normal skirts or a pair of jeans and a cardigan, because that is what makes a performance appealing also it gives the dancer the feeling of a dancer and there are as many different costumes for many different styles of dancing

  • People are what they Wear

    I believe that people are what you wear. The reason that I believe this is because when wearing certain clothes people act differently. For example, uniforms bring people together with others that wear the same uniform. Also, when relaxing people tend to wear more comfortable clothes. These examples show how people are what they wear.

  • I agree to a certain extent

    Clothes is a way of expressing ourselves, our feelings and our identities. It tells a story about the person who wears it. Clothes reveal which group are people in. It shows who you are, but it can also create stereotypes and rejection from another group of the society we live in

  • It certainly can be true.

    Yes, I think that it can be true that a person "is what they wear." People tend to wear what they are comfortable in and what suits them. For instance, I tend to wear jeans and a sweatshirt, and I think this says a lot about the fact that I'm laid-back. The same can be said about the personality of someone who dresses up more often.

  • To an extent.

    It is only true in the sense that your clothes can have an influence on your behavior. I wouldn't say that it changes your true character of whatnot, but it can influence your everyday actions. I have seen it when putting on my Army uniform as well as formal wear.

  • I don't support that opinion of 'you are what you wear'.

    I wear scrubs 90% of the time. Not only at work, but at home too. Why? Because they are comfortable. I dress in clothing that makes me feel comfortable. And if someone gets offended by comfortable clothing, that's their problem. You won't see me on any 'People Of Wallmart' pictures, but you won't see me as a fashion icon either.

  • Is this true?

    I understand that term isn't literal but just because I'm wearing a banana costume doesn't make me a banana? If I wear all black, does that make me a goth or do I just like the colour black? What you wear doesn't define you as a person, it's what makes you individual. Where in fabric and stitches did individuality get lost?

  • No, but what you wear does send messages

    Since people do judge people based on what they wear it's an important consideration but you're still not what you wear and you will not get a completely accurate understanding of a person based on their clothes. You should take the clothes to signify greater or reduced odds of traits, and then keep studying the person. Notice how conscious they seem of how their appearance might be taken. If not at all, their clothes mean less about who they are, if a great deal more about who they are OR what they are trying to portray themselves as.

  • If I put a fur coat on poop, does it suddenly become something else?

    What you wear doesn't really have a whole lot to do with who you are for the most part. If you're wearing nice clothes, it doesn't mean that you're rich, and it' doesn't mean that you're a good person. It just means that you are wearing nice clothes.

    The clothes don't make the man, they just accentuate already existing features.

  • Clothes do not change what is underneath.

    While you can change the way the world looks at you when you change the clothes that you wear, there is still a person under that layer of clothing that doesn't change. You may wear the fanciest suit, but still be an uncultured person underneath that suit, or vice versa.

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