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  • Yes it is

    Hosea 4:6
    "My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge"

    And another one, which also makes sense. Even though, people seems to always forget history.

    "Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it"

    Learning in school is important, not only for the facts being taught, but also for the learning skills.

  • It has many benefits

    History allows us to not make mistakes again. It allows us to make good decisions concerning today's society by comparing it to societies or times in the past when a similar situation arose. For example, it teaches us how war should never be the first choice and it teaches us the importance of disarmament.

    The learning of history also allows students to understand their culture and the reasons for certain festivals or habits more deeply, and thus be more rooted and knowledgeable concerning their own culture.

    History also helps explain the diplomatic relations between countries. For example, students who study history will know the reason why Koreans and Chinese hate the Japanese so much--Japan did huge massacres and raped their women during the Second World War.

    History helps us learn to think from the different perspectives of different countries. It helps us learn about the interests and fundamental beliefs of different countries or races, so in the future, when students become the leaders of the world, they can learn how to negotiate with those from other countries and hopefully coexist in harmony.

  • Sure, be a sheep if you want

    What if I linked a list of 35 instances in which the U.S. has supported fascists, war criminals, terrorists, drug lords, and oppressive despots? How would that affect your views on U.S. foreign policy? What if I told you that the instigators of the first conflict between British colonists and Native Americans were members of a Native American tribe? Don't you agree that these things, while not as financially useful as mathematics or science, are more important- have more of an effect on future events?
    History teaching is a PREVENTIVE measure. It is OBVIOUS why.

  • Its Really important

    We need to know the mistakes we made as a country so we can have better judgment and not make the same mistakes we've made in the past. Teachers teach what's important even if its irrelevant. They teach the con's and pros we've made, Columbus will never discover another landmass, but we must also recognize the good things that have been done.

  • Yes, it's an exercise in critical thinking and a proof of censorship and deliberate lying by the powers that be:

    Much of history learned in school is outright lies. From Columbus to Columbine you will find that many things are "spun" towards a eurocentric "good guy" approach, which makes sense since you are raising an army of patriotic brats who can't think well, but the most important thing this does is destabilize the idea that what is given to you will be the whole truth and it encourages people to seek it out themselves.

  • Of Course it is Important

    Students should absolutely learn about history in school. For one things, learning the actual content allows them to understand how their own culture and other cultures got to where they were today. It also helps them to learn from history and make better decisions for the future. The learning of history is also one of the most beneficial things a student can do in school because looking at issues objectively as well as from multiple perspectives astronomically improves the next generations critical thinking abilities. Learning history is essential to understanding the modern world.

  • Of Course it is Important

    Students should absolutely learn about history in school. For one things, learning the actual content allows them to understand how their own culture and other cultures got to where they were today. It also helps them to learn from history and make better decisions for the future. The learning of history is also one of the most beneficial things a student can do in school because looking at issues objectively as well as from multiple perspectives astronomically improves the next generations critical thinking abilities. Learning history is essential to understanding the modern world.

  • It's just trivia.

    It has been said that "Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it." If we know about an event, know the cause, and know the outcome. We can tell when that event might happen again and if we should encourage or oppose it. So far, you may think that learning history is important, and you would be right. But this is not the type of history we are taught in school. What we are taught in school is often inaccurate and irrelevant. Most people know many things that are or have been taught in school are not exactly true but that is actually less important. If you think back to just about every test you took in history, what types of questions were asked? Who? Where? And When? Even in this statement known around the U.S. "In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue." used to help kids prepare for a test. The information has no relevance to the whole reason to learn history. Will Columbus ever discover another landmass? Nope, Will 1492 ever happen again? Nope. Will the Bahamas and Cuba ever be discovered again? Now that is just silly. About the only use knowledge like this is important is to give an individual or place notoriety. Basically just trivia, yet this type of knowledge is the focus of history classes in school. Far less often do they ask what the cause or outcome is, just who, where, and when.

  • At least not the way the schools teach it.

    Many schools teach a glossed-over version of history, the only useful history I've learned was on my own. To clarify for instance, they never taught me that the stock market crashed due to a de-regulation and globalized market system, I learned that on my own. As for history's usefulness, I think its a pretty cool subject but I don't see how it can benefit anyone per se.


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