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  • It is 100% Practical

    Libertarianism is actually the most practical philosophy there is. It ensures that the government doesn't overstep their boundaries and allows the people to function the way they see fit. I fail to see what is so impractical about a society that functions without the proverbial Big Brother. As a pro-life Libertarian, I fully believe that the government should take a step back, and stop acting in a patronizing way.

  • Can possibly work

    Libertarianism takes things down to the individual level, it focuses on giving government a limited role in society and maximizing individual rights. It dose not mean abolishing the government, but rather gives you the choice if you wish to fund or not to fund the governments policies, it is mostly voluntary. People are still held accountable for crimes and governments still can support the people, however it would be on an unreliable income( voluntary tax system) and would not be permitted to violate the constitution or your individual rights. If it where to do so, it would lose financial support from the people.

  • Absolutely!

    Libertarianism is based on the principles of the Constitution, and that seems very practical to me! I see no problem in a world where the people have the freedom to do anything they please, as long as it does not infringe upon the rights of others. Notice the situation that we are in now, this situation has come about because of an expansion of government. Giving the power back to the people, and restoring the republic is the ultimate goal of Libertarians such as myself. Some say that Libertarians need to 'pick a side.' We have picked a side! We choose the side of the people, and when we start looking at the policies that benefit the people the most (instead of what benefits the government the most), it becomes extremely appealing, and extremely practical, to be a Libertarian.

  • No libertarianism is not practical

    Libertarians assume that laissez-faire attitudes toward economics and political problems will make things settle in a natural, fair order. The problem is that the wealthy and powerful will always game the system to have economic and political advantages. For example, we need civil rights laws otherwise disenfranchised people who do no hold economic or political clout will be discriminated against with no legal recourse.

  • Only on paper

    What gets lost by libertarian voters is not thinking about the situation who they support is in. Gary Johnson made lots of claims he couldn't possibly carry out. He knew this and made them anyway because he was fully aware he wasn't going to be elected so it didn't matter, he was merely trying to dupe people into getting 5% of the vote. Look more closely at what he said he was gong to do. Sounds great, wouldn't happen.

  • Not in the real world

    The trouble with true libertarianism is that, while it recognizes the power of a strong free market system, the philosophy really doesn't want to agree with the thought that regulations mandated by the society at large through a governing body are useful. In other words, a just government acts as a referee in order to protect the good from the bullies and thieves that would take advantage of the weak without such oversight.

  • Not really

    Though many others would say otherwise, libertarians are trapped between two completely polar governing philosophies. What happens often looks like a lie; promises often end up not looking so promising, and identities cause themselves to shift. Libertarians, as I see it, are still a little bit angsty, and just need to pick a side.


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