Is life meaningless (Yes, I know, a very open-ended question)

Asked by: Pase66
  • We are having no reason to be here

    We strive for name,fame and money throughout our life,what is it's meaning when we die. Just think that everyone knows Obama and he will be known after his death but who will be here to know him when the life ends which is sure to happen.
    Therefore I can firmly say that our life is meaningless and we are just mistake of nature.

  • A meaning cannot be agreed on.

    If there is a meaning of life, then it would therefore be something that everyone could agree on. There is nothing which everyone in the world that everyone enjoys, or finds satisfaction in. For this reason, I therefore believe that there is no meaning of life, and we are just here for no purpose.

  • I say yes for two reasons.

    1. Yes life is meaningless if one does not believe that they where created, because then they will just be an object, or an atom working amount many to maintain a whole system of things, in other words, atheist.
    2. No if you do believe that you where created by some powerful being, you have a reason to live, and you will want to why that being created you. You will be on a question.

  • You can give it meaning.

    There isn't and cant be a true honest answer to whether or not LIfe is meaningful; But what is Meaning and what means to us?
    There is no specific object or idea that has meaning to all of us, which then 'means' that what we see as meaningful is purely perceptive subjectiveness.
    E.G. My dog means a lot to me, but because you don't know him/her, does he/she mean to you? What we can say is the common ground of we both like dogs, therefore dogs mean something to the both of us.
    There can also be a life where you may not WANT meaning, but nevertheless meaning may be apart of life if we want it or not.

  • Life does have meaning to it:

    Now, I can't explain why it is we exist (by that, how life got started in the first place). But, I do believe that life has meaning to it, if you can find it. Obviously, its not the same to every person, but it is possible to find meaning in life. One just has to know where to look.

  • We can create the essence (meaning) of our lives.

    According to existentialism, each man and each woman creates the essence (meaning) of their life; life is not determined by a supernatural god or an earthly authority, one is free. As such, one's ethical prime directives are action, freedom, and decision, thus, existentialism opposes rationalism and positivism. In seeking meaning to life, the existentialist looks to where people find meaning in life, in course of which using only reason as a source of meaning is insufficient; this gives rise to the emotions of anxiety and dread, felt in considering one's free will, and the concomitant awareness of death. According to Jean-Paul Sartre, existence precedes essence; the (essence) of one's life arises only after one comes to existence.

    Søren Kierkegaard spoke about a "leap", arguing that life is full of absurdity, and one must make his and her own values in an indifferent world. One can live meaningfully (free of despair and anxiety) in an unconditional commitment to something finite, and devotes that meaningful life to the commitment, despite the vulnerability inherent to doing so.

    Arthur Schopenhauer answered: "What is the meaning of life?" by stating that one's life reflects one's will, and that the will (life) is an aimless, irrational, and painful drive. Salvation, deliverance, and escape from suffering are in aesthetic contemplation, sympathy for others, and asceticism.

    For Friedrich Nietzsche, life is worth living only if there are goals inspiring one to live. Accordingly, he saw nihilism ("all that happens is meaningless") as without goals. He stated that asceticism denies one's living in the world; stated that values are not objective facts, that are rationally necessary, universally binding commitments: our evaluations are interpretations, and not reflections of the world, as it is, in itself, and, therefore, all ideations take place from a particular perspective.

  • You create a meaning of life over time.

    When you're young, life doesn't have a meaning yet. But as you age you begin to see and understand the environment around you and you begin to interpret it. Once you find your dreams and pursue them, you understand and realize that life does have a new meaning to you.

  • Consciousness Says It's Not

    Life is not meaningless for the simple reason that we are alive. Granted, one could make the argument that plants and other creatures are alive that to a certain degree do not comprehend that they are, but does that mean that creatures of [possibly] higher consciousness do not think that other creatures's lives hold meaning? No. Meaning can be found in all forms of life. Now, does consciousness have anything to do with giving life meaning? In my opinion, it doesn't, because wherever life exists, there exists a purpose for that life to be there.

    If you have lived a good life, then meaning can be drawn from experience alone. If you have been dying of hunger since you were born, then why would your life have meaning? Well, I believe that humans have it hardwired in their brains to know that being alive is much better than not. I have yet to find scientific proof of this or a test that measures this in some way, but consciousness is a very powerful thing once you are aware that you have it, and most creatures, including humans will do mostly everything to stay alive even in a state of total misery. Otherwise they would be mass suicide in poverty-stricken regions.

    To say that life is meaningless is to say that there is no purpose for it. Based on the scientific advancement we have achieved and the level of comfort that people enjoy today (believe it or not, in the most peaceful era of human existence) it's clear that life is anything but meaningless.

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