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Is Mylan's proposed $300 coupon for under-insured patients a sufficient response to complaints about the recent price increase of the Epipen?

Is Mylan's proposed $300 coupon for under-insured patients a sufficient response to complaints about the recent price increase of the Epipen?
  • No responses have been submitted.
  • No, this is a way to thwart blame while still turning a profit

    This is Mylan's attempt to thwart blame and to offer a "solution" that still charges too much for the Epipen and the alternative medicine may not be as high of quality as the Epipen. The generic brand may not provide the same quality of medication and is a poor way to try to appease people who are upset over the sky high price of the Epipen.

  • No, this is not a sufficient response.

    Mylan's proposed $300 coupon for under-insured patients is not a sufficient response to the recent price increases of their drug, Epipen. The company must do more to remedy the terrible situation that impacted so many sick people dependent on their drug. Offering a coupon is a nice gesture, but not enough to make things right with customers.

  • No, it is not a suitable solution.

    The $300 savings card is just a PR stunt by the company to make them look like the "good guy." Many people will still have difficulty paying for the Epi-Pens even at a discounted price. The higher overall price drives up health costs in general. Someone is paying for those costs, which inevitably get passed on to the consumer.

  • They have come under fire too much

    Reducing the price of your severely overcosted medical equipment only puts MORE focus on how costly the product is in the first place. If you can get something for $300 off and it's STILL overpriced, you know you have a serious issue. Hopefully consumers will pressure the FDA into allowing competition for Mylan's product.


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