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Is philosophy and religion in conflict with each other?

Asked by: ladiesman
  • Perhaps not yet, but they will soon

    As a planet we tend to treat them rather differently. Philosophy is significantly more embedded within governments, even more so than religion. The difference is that religion, being "separate" from the government, tends to get much more buzz, simply due to its nature. However, philosophy is nowadays (and previously) just the nature of social conformism, and the general populace tend to deviate very little from it. Point is, religion and philosophy, while really similar to one another, are treated very differently by society, and wont be in too much conflict with one another if it stays that way. Once philosophical doctrine is taken more prominently than religion, which I suspect it may eventually (and has in the past), religion will likely fight back, for religion is just a branch of philosophy.

  • Philosophy is all about taking something and thinking of it in a new way and that something is sometimes God

    The God Paradox states asked, "Can God make a rock he can't lift?" The answer is of course yes. He is God and can do everything but no he can't because if he can't lift it he is not all mighty. This shows that Philosophy and Religion can and have worked as one however many thinkers challenged their own faith.

  • Religion is Resignation: Philosophy is Active

    Religion is just resignation when faced with the horrors of the world. Instead of solutions, religion just says "life after death". Philosophy seeks first to understand, and then to propose any needed solutions. The religious demand acceptance of their beliefs without questions. Philosophers welcome dissent and questioning. Religion seeks to declare dissent a thought crime, Philosophy calls dissent the jewel of Liberty.

  • One is systematically false, the other is not.

    Firstly, "religion" needs to be clarified... If we are talking about "religious studies" then both fields are more likely to gain insight from one another rather than be in conflict with each other. However, if we are just talking about the study of philosophy (at least Analytic philosophy anyway), and of "religious beliefs and doctrines in general," then there is something interesting to say here. Philosophy and the philosopher has always aimed (i think anyway) at the goal of discovering what is true with the hopes of thereby gaining knowledge (yes i realize I am making some assumptions in value epistemology with that claim). If this is the case, then philosophy will, in a sense, be in in conflict with any system espousing anything factually or logically incorrect. Now, if you take the view that all religious beliefs are false (that is all religious belief referring to anything supernatural are false), then it follows that philosophy will be in conflict with religion. Philosophy should, by definition, seek to correct any systematically false belief system.

  • Logic is the basis of Philosophy

    Philosophy would be practically impossible if techniques for discerning consistency and validity didn't exist. Without logic, one is completely adrift upon a thrashing ocean of confusion. Philosophy discovers truths and evaluates propositions through a logical lens. Even in philosophies like solipsism or nihilism, these stances have arisen due to convincing logical argumentation.

    Religion crashes into this due to it's inability to question its own fundamental beliefs. Science has axioms which go unchallenged however, these axioms are necessary for progress. Religion inherently disdains progress and change in any form. It's concerned with power, control and subservience not truth, freedom and strength which are the bedrocks of logic. Logic enables us to understand and thus manipulate reality to accomplish our desires through strategy, planning and experimentation. Religion offers idiocy, submission and arbitrary morals, some of which are either preposterous or psychologically damaging!

    Complete conflict.

  • Philosophy is the precursor to all of science

    There is a reason why a PHD is a doctorate in the philosophy of a field. Philosophy is about critical thinking, logic. Regardless of what the colloquial usage has become, the actual field breaks down into how and why we consider things the way that we do. So, given that religion is a faith based position, not a reasoned one, they are necessarily in conflict.

  • They ask the same questions

    Philosophy and religion both ask the big questions; is there a God? Is there a life after death? What is human nature? How are we to live our lives? What differs is their method of finding the answers; philosophy uses reason and religion relies on faith. Thomas Aquinas said that faith and reason never contradict each other when both faith and reason are used properly, the result is truth, and truth can never contradict truth.

  • Religion is part of philosophy

    It's an attempt to solve certain questions. Where exactly is it is said that religion cannot be questioned, aside from the picture used in this post, created by someone who isn't even grammatically advanced enough to put "are" instead of "is" when referring to multiple subjects. So, "ladiesman," I suggest that you stop putting your opinions out on the internet as a legitimate discussion, especially while including media that'll only cause bias. Your entire thread is a joke

  • Religion is a philosophy

    Philosophy in my book, is critical thinking and deriving a explanation through logic. A persons logic can be based on religion, so their explanations can be supported by religion. Therefore religion is a way of thinking, making it a philosophy. Praying five times a day may not make sense to a atheist, but for a religious person it makes sense, because it is common knowledge that there is a life after death. Of course there is also philosophy in conflict with religion, but to say philosophy is directly in conflict with religion, is wrong. If in doubt I will refer to some of the works of Pascal.

  • They can be used to understand eachother

    Philosophy can and is commonly used to justify and reason through religious belief. Arguments like the Kalam, the argument from contingency, and the ontological argument are all philosophical in nature but they answer questions that are inherently religious, so no, philosophy and religion do not come into conflict with one another.

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