• The 4th amendment certainly thinks it is.

    Random drug testing is a direct violation of the 4th amendment. A human being has a right to the privacy of their person. You cannot be drug tested without probable cause. Schools get away with this by only requiring student athletes or students involved in extra activities to submit themselves to the drug testing because what they do is "extra" or "not required of children." But the sad fact is, the kids not involved in other things at their school are the most likely to be doing drugs, not the athletes and the kids who just want to take the Math League test. Either way, this is an invasion of privacy. A good parent should not have to rely on a school to know whether or not their child is doing drugs, just as random drug testing doesn't statistically lower drug use in school.

  • Stress and not on the clock

    I feel that job that drug tests are pointless and ridiculous because as long as they're not coming to work drunk or on drugs and as long as if its not brought in the workplace why does it matter what we do when we're not at work I mean the companies already are putting a stressful life on earth as it is and I don't think there's anything wrong with wanting to go smoke a joint after a hard day of work. If people want to go home and get stoned after a hard day of work then let them.

  • Alcohol will kill you quicker.

    Alcohol will kill you quicker, and tobacco as well. Yet, those things are fine to use and abuse, and are legal. Pot is way safer, Americans are just stupid sheep, that follow the wolves to edge of the cliff. If anybody with an education or medical background on this page, thinks pot is worse then alcohol or tobacco, I want your license revoked because you sir or ma'am are just a moron, well most Americans are.

  • It assumes guilt.

    In our society, we are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty. Drug testing assumes everyone is guilty until they prove themselves to be innocent. Jobs take away 40 hours a week of our freedom in exchange for money. I don't think they need to take away our freedom when we are not working and not being paid. I could possibly support exceptions for certain jobs where the lives of others are in your hands, such as police, doctors, etc. If an office worker smoked weed on the weekend, I don't see who it hurts.

  • It is dangerous

    Freedom of not being "forced to pee in a small cup because some guy thinks he is more important than you" must be protected. If not, it will only get worse...

    What would you say for situation when you go to work, and a door handle automatically scans your health status, so chief will just fire you because you have been drinking yesterday? Why? Well, because there is a candidate for your job too, who is complete abstinent. And who cares that you were sober, the company just want to be sure, ok?

    You gonna end up there one day, and it will be even much worse. Thus, hell no, to some random testing. Because big bad things starts with small bad things.

  • Its an invasion of privacy and not necessary

    To be randomly forced to pee in a cup is not only awkward but seriously unnecessary without some evidense backing up the possiblility that this person may be doing drugs. Also what this person may do for recreational perposes so long as its non violent should'nt be anyone but his/her buisiness

  • But Only In Some Cases

    Students are compelled by law to go to school, so "knowing it might happen" is not an excuse to subject them to random testing. If parents suspect their kids are abusing drugs then they may test their kids, that is their responsibility.
    As for jobs, if it's the sort of thing where just in case they call you in you must keep a clear head at all times then it's justified. If not, then what you do on your own time is none of your employer's business, only your drug use at or just before going to work is his business and so only tests narrowly tailored to show positive results only if the employee comes to work high should be allowed. People have a right to their own lives and lifestyle choices when they are not on company time. It's as inappropriate as requiring employees to follow a certain dieting regimen outside of work.

  • Work place employees

    The employer has the right to say what their employees look like. Also, safety is an issue in the work place. If an employee of a business were to be under the influence of a substance and there were an incidence, then the employer would be responsible for the incidence. The employer could lose thousands of dollars for an accident that their employee that was under the influence while operating machinery.

  • It's so stupid.

    If people don't want to do drug tests then they don't have to. They should go after the ones that look like they did/do drugs not the whole school. We can admit that not everyone does drugs. It violates our fourth amendment. The constitution is for us. So, they should have a vote or be told that there is a drug test.

  • No it's not wrong

    No, I personally don't think that random drug testing is wrong. I think it's a great idea in most workplaces and in high schools and athletics. If someone knows a test is coming up, they can try to stay sober and "pass" the test, then go back to the same drugs they used beforehand.

  • No, under certain conditions

    For a retail worker or a data entry specialist random drug testing is invasive and hard to justify. However, for a police officer or a emergency room doctor, it makes sense. These people are responsible for the lives of others and special precautions are sometimes necessary when dealing in these extremes.

  • No, random drug testing is not wrong.

    As long as employees or students know that random drug testing might happen, it is not wrong. Random drug testing has the effect of encouraging less drug use. Less drug use means better actions and choices, whether someone is at school or on the job. Random drug testing does not violate a person's rights, as long as he knows ahead of time that there is a possibility it might happen.

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