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  • I agree...It is because it isnt one of the listed feasts that Yahushua spoke of.

    Pretty much sums it up. All holidays are pagan if it was spoke of to keep by our messiah....To me I dont care what anyone celebrates but to go and twist a pagan day into making it a "godly" one to suit you to feel better is what ticks me off...Christmas is not the birth of Christ, duhh? Give me a break....Always twisted man made up to add to more made up man stuff...Cracks me up!

  • Leviticus 23 doesn't support St. Patrick's day

    St. Patrick's day isn't found as one of YHVH's feasts in Leviticus 23. Does St. Patrick's day honor the Almighty, or His Son? Is St. Patrick's day a fulfillment of Y'shua's 70 week ministry? Is St. Patrick's day prophetic of Y'shua's return? I find "No" to be the answer to all my previous questions. Seems to me that originally this day was YHVH's, then the Pagans were never shown the true light, so they still want to worship false idols on this day. So the Pagans invented a holy day for themselves based off of YHVH's creation. Then later on the Catholic Church being lead or mislead by man claimed the holiday to strike out Paganism. All in all, worship YHVH, and through the death and resurrection of His Son, Y'shua we have atonement for our sins. We are to turn from our wicked ways and follow the instructions that YHVH gave us. Choose this day whom you will serve.

  • Leviticus 23 doesn't support St. Patrick's day

    St. Patrick's day isn't found as one of YHVH's feasts in Leviticus 23. Does St. Patrick's day honor the Almighty, or His Son? Is St. Patrick's day a fulfillment of Y'shua's 70 week ministry? Is St. Patrick's day prophetic of Y'shua's return? I find "No" to be the answer to all my previous questions. Seems to me that originally this day was YHVH's, then the Pagans were never shown the true light, so they still want to worship false idols on this day. So the Pagans invented a holy day for themselves based off of YHVH's creation. Then later on the Catholic Church being lead or mislead by man claimed the holiday to strike out Paganism. All in all, worship YHVH, and through the death and resurrection of His Son, Y'shua we have atonement for our sins. We are to turn from our wicked ways and follow the instructions that YHVH gave us. Choose this day whom you will serve.

  • Catholicism Not Christianity

    I see one of the problems here that could help define this debate better. If one believes that Catholicism is compatible with biblical Christianity, then yes St. Patrick's Day could be defined as a Christian holiday. However, since there are plenty of Catholic doctrines that are incompatible with the Bible, I feel it best to vote "yes" and say that St. Patrick's Day is not a Christian holiday, but a holiday with pagan roots that was adopted by a church with a mix of both pagan and Christian roots. It is now, at the very least, a Catholic holiday. Then again, Catholicism itself has its entire foundation in the mixture of paganism and Christianity. But many Christians do not recognize that and refer to it as a Christian holiday as a result, which is understandable given their knowledge about it. So this is nothing new.

  • Yes lots of "Christian holidays" are just makeovers of pagan ones.

    One way to combat paganism was to adopt their holidays and make them over into Christian holidays. Removing festivals and celebrations is a hard sell, so they just Christianized them. Christmas was the pagan celebration of the birth of Mithra and occurs around that date and Easter is a remake of the pagan holiday centered around the spring equinox (celebrating resurrection and rebirth). Saint Patrick's Day occurs very near the spring equinox for that reason

  • Catholic beliefs led to the abolished Druids and Celtic Pagans; St Patrick's Day is NOT a Pagan Holiday.

    The reality is this; the closest Celtic-Pagan holiday is Eostara, which is one of many holidays that was stripped of the Pagan belief structure to embody a Catholic belief in order to convert/destroy an ancient belief structure of nature. They set it out for an additional amount of time and called it Easter.

    Furthermore, Snakes are a symbol of Wisdom in the Pagan beliefs just as the Apple and Apple Tree are. Please realize the creation story in Catholic beliefs is about the removal of seeking wisdom in order to stay in paradise. I believe we call that ignorance. When the "first humans" ate of the tree of Wisdom, it is told that a snake (which is symbolized as the Devil in Catholicism) convinced Eve to eat of the tree of Knowledge (the Apple tree) and to give this to her husband, blaming the fall of Paradise on a woman. This opens up the opportunity for the Bishops and Priests in a faith that was bent on conquering the world in their missionary aspects to degrade women and make them less than a man in societies eyes. Remember that many Pagan societies delegated the woman to make the decisions, carry forward any lands, heritage and traditions. Only after Catholic dogma started spreading like a wildfire was their the reversal on the roles. Pagans believe that both the God figure and the Goddess figure are sacred, as well as all living creatures.

    St Patrick is the man who "drove the snakes from Ireland"; he drove out an ancient belief due to his schizophrenic perception that "God" was speaking to him and telling him to be a missionary for the Catholic Church and Bible. This could not be considered a Pagan holiday or celebration due to this fact alone. A man decided to spread the word of a Catholic Deity. It is quite simple. For his decision, when he died he was proclaimed a saint. So were many other people who slaughtered people and destroyed a culture and way of life for their own gains.

  • No, Saint Patrick was trying to undo pagan ideals.

    If Saint Patrick was trying to undo pagan ideals, then how can Saint Patrick's Day be a pagan holiday? That would mean that the facts contradict themselves. So that means that Saint Patrick's Day is not pagan because it is not celebrated like a pagan holiday. It was meant to be a Christian holiday.

  • If he worked to serve the catholic church...

    Saint Patrick was the champion of the Catholic church in his time and worked to undo Pagan ideals to replace them with Christianity. His holiday celebrates his actions and was instituted by the Catholic church. It may be counter productive to consider this celebration a pagan holiday considering the reasons behind it.

  • No, not anymore, it is no longer about worship.

    St. Patrick's Day certainly started out as a Pagan celebration, but history shows that Christmas, Easter, and a number of other holidays have Pagan roots. Today, St. Patrick's Day is celebrated primarily by exploring Irish cultural activities and drinking green beer. To me, a pagan holiday would be one that relates more to a complex worshipful ceremony built around a polytheistic pantheon. St. Patrick's day is generally not practiced this way.

  • Technically no, but....

    Technically no, St. Patrick's Day is not a pagan holiday, but unfortunately has turned into the major beer-drinking, hooligan acting holiday of the year. But originally, St. Patrick's Day was a day to honor a Catholic saint and will always remain so, no matter how people choose to celebrate it or what craziness is attached to that celebration.

  • St. Patrick's Day celebrates a missionary.

    Christmas and Easter can both be traced to pagan tradition, a celebration of the winter and spring solstices and each can be said to have been stolen by Christians. The same is true here, many of the traditions associated with the holiday are based on pagan history, symbols and beliefs, but St. Patrick's Day in the United States is celebrated to honor a missionary who is credited with converting Ireland to Christianity, or for driving the snakes (pagans) out of the country. Sadly, too few people know the history behind any of it and too many people are Christian to say that the holidays are anything but theirs at this point.


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