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  • Churches don't pay taxes!

    How much separate from the state can you possibly be when you don't pay taxes to it? The laws of the state are not written by churches. There are some similarities but they are coincidental. The church may influence some people but the church does not influence the state because they don't realistically contribute to the state by paying taxes.

  • Christians are vying for too much influence

    Let me preface my argument by saying that I myself is a Christian. I prefer secular laws, because I don't want to live in a society that I am forced to live by some other religions laws. On the flip side I look at it as if I am not a Christian. It wouldn't be fair to be forced by someone else's rules just because of their religion. Hypothetically if we adopt Christian laws, then we should put in Islamic laws, any atheist that wants a law change to suit his views should have that law changed in his favor, Hindu, so on and so forth. I believe we open up a Pandora's box with this and it will lead to minority groups, religions, and people being attacked for being who they are. Why does America insist on going after minorities? Look what's happening to the gay community. They're a minority group but we go after them because they go against our religious beliefs, probably not their personal beliefs. Anyways are laws were created to protect unpopular things, not promote angry, uneducated majorities. Back to the question, I think it is important that the state and church stay separate, because if they came together I fear people who don't believe in the same things as the church will come under unfair attack. Just look at the clown in Dallas that Tebow didn't want to go his church because of his outlandish statements. He has the freedom of speech to say those things, I won't deny it but I would fear if more powerful of his kind got that kind of power over the whole nation. We were created to be a nation of tolerance, not ignorance and selection.

  • Christians are vying for too much influence

    Let me preface my argument by saying that I myself is a Christian. I prefer secular laws, because I don't want to live in a society that I am forced to live by some other religions laws. On the flip side I look at it as if I am not a Christian. It wouldn't be fair to be forced by someone else's rules just because of their religion. Hypothetically if we adopt Christian laws, then we should put in Islamic laws, any atheist that wants a law change to suit his views should have that law changed in his favor, Hindu, so on and so forth. I believe we open up a Pandora's box with this and it will lead to minority groups, religions, and people being attacked for being who they are. Why does America insist on going after minorities? Look what's happening to the gay community. They're a minority group but we go after them because they go against our religious beliefs, probably not their personal beliefs. Anyways are laws were created to protect unpopular things, not promote angry, uneducated majorities. Back to the question, I think it is important that the state and church stay separate, because if they came together I fear people who don't believe in the same things as the church will come under unfair attack. Just look at the clown in Dallas that Tebow didn't want to go his church because of his outlandish statements. He has the freedom of speech to say those things, I won't deny it but I would fear if more powerful of his kind got that kind of power over the whole nation. We were created to be a nation of tolerance, not ignorance and selection.

  • How can it?

    No, they aren't. When the state is responsible for things such as Gay Marriage and Abortion (many more things as well), the Church is GOING to get involved. You can't avoid it. Though they should be, they simply cannot be. I feel that the Church is never going to be separated. I feel this because you're always going to have a religious influence unless EVERY SINGLE member of the state is Atheist. You can't run from it until then. And lets be realistic here, not everyone is going to be an Atheist for thousands of years (If we last that long or if it can happen at all).

  • Not openly, but discreetly, as if from the shadows.

    There is supposed to be a separation between the Church and the State. And officially, there is. The actions of the United States are not dictated or influenced by the will of the Holy See in Italy. But religion exists within the government, brought there by the elected delegates running each State and representing each State in Congress and the Senate. It exists through the affiliations each elected representative has. Which is why the U.S. is constantly struggling over the matter of Same-Sex Marriage. Many politicians opposed to the idea are opposed because of their religious affiliations, which is not a valid reason to oppose the notion because there is supposed to be a separation between the Church and matters of State.

  • Religion is seen everyday in schools and government.

    Everyday the schools say their pledge of allegiance, which mentions the name God from the Christian faith. Christianity is intertwined with government and public life. Take our currency for example: the phrase "In God We Trust" is engraved on it. We also hear high government officials saying, "May God bless America."

  • Civil marriage is not separation of church and state.

    as long as homosexuals are getting married separation of church and sate is not truly separated. As long as marriages done by courts then its jot really separated. Think about it, separation of church and state separates everything religious and everything legal. Marriage existed before government and before civilization. Its been done by the Egyptians, hebrew, Indians etc...all ancient civilizations and it has always been done as a religious practice BEFORE government so why does government gets to define marriage? Religion already did and if it really was separation of church and state the government wouldn't try to re-define it.


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