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  • The system doesn't care.

    If the system cared about what we learned about in school, we'd have it like it was when our parents were in school. I'm a senior in high school and I would go home and ask my mom how to do something for math and she wouldn't even know what I was doing because the system would change how to find the answer to something as simple as adding 2 plus 2.

  • School is not but the curriculum is.

    I'm a sophomore in high school, and I feel that over half the stuff I am learning will not benefit me in real life. In a good amount of my classes I have been relearning the same thing since fifth grade. All of our classes are useful but only to a point, there is a time where we start learning things that may never benefit us in life. I feel that By eighth or ninth grade, maybe earlier, students should be able to choose what subjects they enjoy and want to learn more about(algebra,English,biology,etc.). With that said there are still some thin that I think should be mandatory for everyone. Everyone should learn about the political system, our human rights,atlas basic first aid, how to balance a check book, and so on. Instead of being taught how to sit down for hours and take a test, maybe we should learn how to survive in the real world.

  • School is a joke

    School doesn't teach anything useful. I am a junior in high school and all that I have earned so far is how to take a test and how to sit in a classroom for 90 minutes. If the goal of school is to prepare you for the world why do they teach to the test? I am very intelligent but my grades do not reflect.

  • Undergrad is the biggest travesty

    Our public elementary through high schools leave much to be desired, but there are at least some very good public high schools. Undergrad education outside of STEM is a complete joke. I went to a top-3 public university and the curriculum in the social sciences, and to a lesser extent the humanities, was absurd. They are indoctrinating people into a depraved leftist world view where everything boils down to identity, privilege, race, and gender. People are going into enormous debt to be actively made stupider. Even the STEM courses are often poorly designed and taught by professors who couldn't possibly care less about their undergrad classes. If it weren't for the cartel-like racket that the academic ratings institutions, the colleges, and the federal lenders have established then the whole system would collapse under the pressure of the free market. People need to realize that you can get a much better education (provided you are intelligent) on the internet than you could ever hope to get at a "prestigious" university.

  • Most of the things that children are learning will not benifit them in real life

    I really do think the education system is a joke. Instead of learning about useful things like the government, taxes, and mortgage, I'm stuck here explaining the difference between a square and a rectangle, and learning about different types of rocks! I can assure you that none of these benefit anyone in the real world. It's basically teach you random things that you don't need to know, and then off you go in to the big world full of political nonsense and financial chaos! And then there is the tests. Schools really care more about those end of the year school board tests than they do teaching young minds. They are molding our youth in to something that shall not benefit future generations. This is a vicious cycle of random knowledge and tests leading up to what? Success? I doubt that.

  • What is it really teaching me?

    As an education major going into my fourth year of college, if one were to ask me what I learned during my tenure at my university, I would reply, "That I'll be paying student loans until I die - and even after that." It's ridiculous. I'm taking classes that will never resurface when I enter into my career and I'm pouring money into an institution without the guarantee that I'll get my job in my desired field. I want to be a high school history teacher, and one of the most ridiculous classes that I have to take is a biology class. Why do I need biology to teach my students about World War II? And don't get me started with the screening process for education majors. Yay! I get to spend more money to take classes that would never help me for the real world. The American education system becomes a more financial business rather than a institution that allows for students to take their required classes. I don't need fluffy classes that have nothing to do with what I want to teach about - and that's why I appreciate the tech/vocational schools. An electrician takes electrical classes. A beauty consultant takes business and beauty classes. Me writing a five-paged paper about stem cells will never help my students learn about Dr. Martin Luther King and his work. Why am I taking these courses? It's just mind-boggling.

  • What is it really teaching me?

    As an education major going into my fourth year of college, if one were to ask me what I learned during my tenure at my university, I would reply, "That I'll be paying student loans until I die - and even after that." It's ridiculous. I'm taking classes that will never resurface when I enter into my career and I'm pouring money into an institution without the guarantee that I'll get my job in my desired field. I want to be a high school history teacher, and one of the most ridiculous classes that I have to take is a biology class. Why do I need biology to teach my students about World War II? And don't get me started with the screening process for education majors. Yay! I get to spend more money to take classes that would never help me for the real world. The American education system becomes a more financial business rather than a institution that allows for students to take their required classes. I don't need fluffy classes that have nothing to do with what I want to teach about - and that's why I appreciate the tech/vocational schools. An electrician takes electrical classes. A beauty consultant takes business and beauty classes. Me writing a five-paged paper about stem cells will never help my students learn about Dr. Martin Luther King and his work. Why am I taking these courses? It's just mind-boggling.

  • An outsider's perspective

    Most of my life I have been homeschooled, but in 2014 I took 1 year of public school and in 2015 one year of private school. Public school did nothing for me and I ended the year with at least a 98 in every class. Being an outsider, I was shut out from the group and made a target, and the teachers would say that they didn't give busywork, and then make you copy words 15 times and not even look at the paper! I finished the year top of my class and having gathered no information and won a spelling bee.

  • Fluff degrees + High cost of tuition = No careers + Student Debt

    I believe that like banks, the educational system has become another financial institution. As of 2016 a rough estimate in Domestic student debt is around 1.3 trillion dollars. Not enough funding is going towards schools so they either cut corners with education or raise the cost of tuition. Many students who do go to college take out loans that they'll need to repay eventually.
    However many that graduate find themselves with degrees that either don't have high employ-ability, job growth, upward mobility and most importantly the skills necessary to work in that field.
    I'm a great example: So I got an AA in Graphic Design, who does that right? Well I was hoping to do something with the degree but Graphic Design really doesn't exist anymore, Instead its Graphic Design/Web Developer with an emphasis on the later. Most of the courses I took were based on the Print aspect of the degree with a little HTML/CSS coding. However most employers where I'm from want you to also have JavaScript under your belt as well as PHP scripting and MY/SQL. Another problem is experience many employers are looking for people with 5+ years of experience which makes it hard to get into unless you freelance or intern. PS my internship was a joke. Most of these low level companies want free labor and often don't train you in the field your getting a degree in. You'll learn how to get them coffee and use their copy machine. WOOPIE!! So now your out trying to find work, competing with people that have experience , while lacking skills, with student debt, and degree with slow job growth. Another thing to consider is while your not working in the field your degree is in, especially computers, new technology and software is coming out. Your skills may become antiquated if you don't keep up with the changes in software programs and technology.
    This is only one aspect of the problem. Think about all the young adults that are have to work 2 jobs just to survive and go to college. Maybe they are so busy just trying to make it, they can't get out of the debt hole their in, let alone the opportunities to explore a higher education.

    I think there needs to be more funding for schools, and lets take it from the Multimillionaire/Billionaire 1% rather than your average hardworking taxpayers that have no more to give. If you we can cut student tuition and debt down that would be a huge victory.

    Also colleges need to do a much better job collaborating with big industries do find out what their looking from a college grad, especially in the technical degrees. That might require streamlining certain programs to get all the technical courses necessary for the job, rather than having to take unnecessary fluff courses.
    Finally if Employers are going to hire interns, then they need to be job specific internships, that help further your education and experience in the field of work.

  • It teaches little about the rest of the world.

    When you guys are in school your public system you guys only learn about the bad things and the country's past and you guys do not learn what countries are like now. You guys don't learn anything about the rest of the world and it makes you guys ignorant and you guys are proud of being ignorant.

  • It's not what it used to be!

    Six years of study and one master's degree later and I feel no better equipped than before starting college. The journey was expensive and disappointing. The public school system doesn't prepare you for the realities of college and the work force. In fact, as a sophomore and senior in high school, my teachers spoon fed me the notion that higher education would lead to a good job and a secure future. Hogwash. Unless your goal is professional in nature - that is - medical school, dentistry, chiropractic, CPA, architect, etc., don't expect much of a return on your investment. My colleagues, who also hold master's degrees in various disciplines, are riding in the same boat as me. Employers don't care about your degree (even though they ask for it as a prerequisite to employment). Jobs are difficult to obtain even with advanced degrees. The market is flooded with college graduates who can't make ends meet and settle for jobs that don't require post secondary education. In addition, the landscape of employment versus education has drastically changed and employers are choosing candidates that have years of experience and credentials from 1st tier schools. So basically, 10 - 15 percent of all graduates are fortunate enough to have the skills and aptitude that employers are looking for (not to mention political connections) in order to secure a well paying job. The rest of us simply settle for jobs as couriers for UPS, McDonald's Staples, etc. My advise to high school students who have no interest in studying medicine, architecture, etc., a community college diploma or a skilled trade will get you much farther than a liberal arts degree.

  • School is important.

    Honestly I am a Senior in high school and there are students in my class that can honest to god not read a damn thing out of the textbooks. I paid attention in school and have learned just about all there is to know about education. No it is not things that would be great to know, like how to write a check our whether I should buy a car with a bigger down payment and less interest or a larger rate of interest but a smaller down payment but, the things that I have learned keep me up to date. The schools aren't teaching you what to think. They are teaching you how to think. The simple fact is, if you pay attention in school you won't be one of the retards that have to do a googles search for everything they don't know. School is not a joke. The students that misuse it just make it seem that way.

  • The American education system is not always a joke.

    While Americans are not as educated as many other people in the world, it is wrong and stereotypical to say that the entire education system is a joke. I think it all depends on the teachers and the students willingness to learn. I for one have received a decent education.

  • I disagree with this

    It's not a joke, it's a serious importance of government society and why should you put kids in school? Don't you know if your kid is suspended from school? It's not fair to suspend a child from school. Several more years of human rights now! What if you have a kid in any school, these schools shall be free for kids to enter. Do not pay for the private and public schools.


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