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  • Yes, it is.

    While this is a very nice gesture to the religious and a good acknowledgement of social issues, it is also a slap in the face of the founding premise of modern government - the separation of Church and State. A "National Day of Prayer" infringes on the beliefs of atheists, for example, who do not pray. Further more, setting aside one single day for remembrance and attempts to aid other humans trivializes the day to day struggle and only serves to placate people by allowing them to say "Well, I prayed on the right day, so I helped!"

  • Yes, it is.

    While this is a very nice gesture to the religious and a good acknowledgement of social issues, it is also a slap in the face of the founding premise of modern government - the separation of Church and State. A "National Day of Prayer" infringes on the beliefs of atheists, for example, who do not pray. Further more, setting aside one single day for remembrance and attempts to aid other humans trivializes the day to day struggle and only serves to placate people by allowing them to say "Well, I prayed on the right day, so I helped!"

  • The Constitution prevents endorsement of religion.

    It doesn't just protect against the government instituting a state religion, but also against the government endorsing or promoting any religion or religious behavior. The "National Day of Prayer" was instituted by Congress in 1952 as a knee jerk reaction to communism, the same as the change in the Pledge of Allegiance and the motto on our paper currency. All amount to the government endorsing or promoting religion.

  • Hey. We get Christmas off.

    It is completely constitutional. The government simply recognizes the holiday, but doesn't enforce anything on that day. If however, the government forces that day to be a day off, that becomes a problem.

    This is a largely Christian country. "Prayer" is in demand. Most people say it's good. There is public support and it's not like it's bad for anyone.

  • No the National Day of Prayer is not unconstitutional.

    The designation of a "National Day of Prayer" is not unconstitutional. The recognizing the value that prayer has to some citizens the government is acknowledging that value and making a public acceptance of that value. The government is not recognizing or promoting any specific religion or set or religious beliefs. No one is required to pray or to even acknowledge prayers.

  • Nothing of the sort.

    If we get rid of the National day of prayer why not get rid of Christmas and Easter? They are religious holidays too, you know. We are not forcing atheist to pray anymore than then we are forcing them to do their Christmas shopping. Contrarily, they are forcing us not to pray. Talk about hypocrisy. Especially with the Constitution being a Christian document which mentions the name of God more than once.

  • National Day of prayer is perfectly constitutional

    National Day of Prayer is a time set aside by our government to pray for them. If those in power can conclude that they need prayer then is doing so such a big request to ask? It's not about if YOU want to do it our not. It's about lifting up others and helping them in prayer. Politics is not walk in the park. There is a long line of prayer in our government stemming all the way back to the first Thanksgiving. Request for Fasting and Prayer have also been made by out government. The Constitution upholds this right in the The First Amendment " prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting. . ." National Day of prayer id not a mandate. If you choose not to pray don't.

  • No the National Day of Prayer is not unconstitutional.

    The designation of a "National Day of Prayer" is not unconstitutional. The recognizing the value that prayer has to some citizens the government is acknowledging that value and making a public acceptance of that value. The government is not recognizing or promoting any specific religion or set or religious beliefs. No one is required to pray or to even acknowledge prayers.

  • There is No establishment of a religion

    Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

    No where in the constitution does it say that government can not contain religion. It says that it may not establish religion. It also says that people have the right to petition the government. If people are so upset about the national day of prayer and if there are enough our there they should petition for it's removal.


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