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  • Waterboarding Simulates Drowning

    Waterboarding simulates drowning, so yes, it is torture. There is no need to participate in such barbarism in order to get information. Try sleep deprivation--eventually, the prisoner will make a mistake and answer an interrogation truthfully. Getting prisoners inebriated or high on drugs has the same effect--honesty and lack of judgment. Those techniques are far more effective than waterboarding.

  • It's the very definition

    Waterboarding is absolutely torture. You cannot hide behind buzzwords like "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques" and expect us to believe that waterboarding is not torture. No less an angry authority than Christopher Hitchens went through the process of waterboarding to prove that it wasn't - and found that he had changed his mind completely, realizing it was a horrible act to inflict on another human being. And he just did it as an experiment!

  • Waterboarding is physical and mental torture.

    There is no doubt about it, waterboarding is considered to be torture. It's a physical act that induces a panicked mental state that makes someone feel like they're drowning or suffocating. As such, it's torture, and it should not be something that we permit to be used as part of an interrogation process.

  • Waterboarding is Torture

    Yes, waterboarding is torture. Waterboarding causes the victim to feel as if she or he cannot breathe. This causes panic to rise in the victim and leads to a major panic attack. As someone who has experienced major panic attacks, I can tell you that the experience is quite torturous.

  • Yes, but it is necessary.

    Yes, waterboarding is torture, because the person who is subjected to it is subject to extreme terror. The person who is waterboarded thinks that they are drowning. It is a terrible feeling that puts the person into a panic. This is not to say that torture does not have its merits, especially when people want to kill Americans, but yes, by its nature and the fear it inflicts, it is torture.

  • It meets the definition.

    Waterboarding is torture. It meets the definition of torture as the term "torture" means: any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in or incidental to lawful sanctions.

  • Of course it is

    Waterboarding is the act of making someone feel like they are drowning and doing this over and voer to retrieve information that the person may not even have. It also has been linked to other health problems that can also ravage people, so waterboarding is in every sense of the word, torture.

  • Waterboarding is torture

    It meets the definition of torture as
    The term "torture" means any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in or incidental to lawful sanctions.

  • No more than we do to our own military

    If we can legally do something to our troops of training purposes I do not see any reason we cannot do the same (off of United States soil and only to enemy combatants) to those who we are at war with. I think there should be very limited circumstances and types of enhanced interrogations that should be used, so far I believe we only waterboarded 2 or 3 terrorists. I guess if it does no physical harm (cuts, bruises, abraisions, broken bones) doesn't actually keep them under the water until they become unconsious, and is monitored closely by medical personel, I can see the limited use of it. Also I will note I don't believe it should ever be allowed on US soil, on a US citizen, and should only be able to be used with high up authorization and when there is good reason to believe information gained from the subject can and would save lives.


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