Is the main aim of education to prepare students for a career?

  • Education is to prepare students for a career and life

    Yes, one of the main aims of education is to prepare students for not only what they will doing in their future, but also general life situations. If a students grows up and cannot read, he or she will most likely not be able to function. This is also true for basic math, in life there is math executed everyday, such as paying or item and receiving change.

  • School motivates students for a career choice.

    While school does help to motivate the social skills of students, it's main gold is to ready them for the real world. We learn English skills, and typing skills. Without this learning, we would not be prepared when we graduate into the working area. Our teachers work hard to teach skills that will help us after graduation.

  • Yes, it is

    There's something to be said for the babysitting element, but the main aim of education is to awaken students. It's to give them an idea of what they want to be in the world and prepare them with the knowledge to go out and achieve it. School is where career aspirations begin.

  • Education preparing students for a career

    Yes, it is. We go to school to learn about the world so when we graduate we can go to a higher learning and start doing the things that we want to be working for the rest of our lives, with out education we would not be able to know what to do in our world

  • No, education is not only about career, it has its own definition.

    Google defines education as "the process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school or university", other dictionaries describe the similar thing in a different way. But you cannot find a dictionary which defines education as preparing for your career.

    Education is giving the students what they don't have. Students taking science as their subject does not mean that they want a career related to science or to become a scientist, it means that they show interest towards science and they want to gain further knowledge in that subject. If the aim of education is to prepare students for their career, then why are the other subjects taught that are not related to your career.

  • What about democracy?

    There's more to life than economics. A democracy can't function without rational, responsible citizens who actively participate in its institutions. By focusing on people's roles in the economy we're neglecting their roles as self-advocates on a myriad of other issues that affect our nation. How can we expect young people to be capable of standing up for their social, economic, and political rights if, instead of giving them practice in cooperative problem solving and involving them in democratic processes, we simply focus on teaching them job skills.

  • Times are changing.

    I disagree with this statement because times are changing, and the things we're learning in school won't be useful in a few years, due to continuous new research. We should learn things that will be used in all fields, every day, and for the rest of our lives. But by the time students get to college, their prior knowledge will be expired.

  • No, I disagree because the schools are too worried about the little things.

    When I was in school, the most realistic thing we learned in school was how to write a check. On every thing else, the teachers were worried about the little things. I always had trouble in Math because, even though I got the answer right, it wasn't how they wanted it to be done. My parents fought tooth and nail, and always asked "Why does it matter if she does this way or that? She got the answer right in a way she understands." My nieces and nephews are going through the same problem. I've never had a job where my boss was upset if I did something a little different as long as it got done.

    Schools also don't warn you about how hard it can be to find a job, or how hard it may be to pay off your student loan.

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