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Out of these two moral motivations, which one is more sufficient? Belief in God (yes) or reason (no)?

Asked by: ladiesman
  • Belief in God is more sufficient for moral motivations.

    In order to have an absolute morality we need to derive it from a supreme authority and that supreme authority is God. God can provide the absolute moral standards that we humans can follows. Reason can only taken us so far and not beyond that as which seems reasonable to someone may seem unreasonable to other persons. However, belief in God is a basic belief and it can definitely be a torch bearer for moral motivations. In the absence of belief in God we will fall back into moral relativism where everything would be correct and there would be no standards to measure our activities as moral or immoral.

  • Belief in God is more sufficient for moral motivations.

    In order to have an absolute morality we need to derive it from a supreme authority and that supreme authority is God. God can provide the absolute moral standards that we humans can follows. Reason can only taken us so far and not beyond that as which seems reasonable to someone may seem unreasonable to other persons. However, belief in God is a basic belief and it can definitely be a torch bearer for moral motivations. In the absence of belief in God we will fall back into moral relativism where everything would be correct and there would be no standards to measure our activities as moral or immoral.

  • To think morally is to think critically

    Ethics involves critical analysis of human acts to determine their rightness and wrongness; who will be benefitted? Who will be harmed? Is it consistent with established values? The divine command theory uses the promise of reward and fear of punishment, which is impure. Ethical systems that have a religious basis hold that belief in God and understanding the relationship between humanity and God is the foundation of moral behavior. If God made humans to be autonomous and rational beings (argued by Saint Augustine), then we are free to choose which principles to ascribe to. If God's will determines what is good, that's obedience talking, not morality.

  • To think morally is to think critically

    Ethics involves critical analysis of human acts to determine their rightness and wrongness; who will be benefitted? Who will be harmed? Is it consistent with established values? The divine command theory uses the promise of reward and fear of punishment, which is impure. Ethical systems that have a religious basis hold that belief in God and understanding the relationship between humanity and God is the foundation of moral behavior. If God made humans to be autonomous and rational beings (argued by Saint Augustine), then we are free to choose which principles to ascribe to. If God's will determines what is good, that's obedience talking, not morality.

  • To think morally is to think critically

    Ethics involves critical analysis of human acts to determine their rightness and wrongness; who will be benefitted? Who will be harmed? Is it consistent with established values? The divine command theory uses the promise of reward and fear of punishment, which is impure. Ethical systems that have a religious basis hold that belief in God and understanding the relationship between humanity and God is the foundation of moral behavior. If God made humans to be autonomous and rational beings (argued by Saint Augustine), then we are free to choose which principles to ascribe to. If God's will determines what is good, that's obedience talking, not morality.

  • To think morally is to think critically

    Ethics involves critical analysis of human acts to determine their rightness and wrongness; who will be benefitted? Who will be harmed? Is it consistent with established values? The divine command theory uses the promise of reward and fear of punishment, which is impure. Ethical systems that have a religious basis hold that belief in God and understanding the relationship between humanity and God is the foundation of moral behavior. If God made humans to be autonomous and rational beings (argued by Saint Augustine), then we are free to choose which principles to ascribe to. If God's will determines what is good, that's obedience talking, not morality.

  • Both but belief in god has causes immorality to often

    Believing in god has no affect on morality often times. The inquisitions, the crusades, colonialism, modern Islamic extremist terrorism, Jewish ultra-Zionism all these immoral acts and events were performed by believers in god, their belief in him didn't affect their morality. Belief in god can often help people be moral though but reason is a far better explanation for morality. Morality came not from god but from people, people established rules and morals so they could co-exist and prosper as opposed to killing each other all the time (they still killed each other often enough though).

  • Belief in God without reason is blind.

    Reason is the basis for my knowledge of God (I don't use the term "belief" if I know something for sure, sorry if I sound arrogant). I use reason for morality as well. If I used God alone as the basis for morality, I would have to ask myself, "What would God want?", but since I use reason, I make moral decisions based on how it affects society.

  • Morality free from religion is possible

    Belief in god really is not a good moral motivation. Many people claim to get morality from religion, when actually it is completely normal to be moral even without religion. As Christopher Hitchens put it, "Human decency is not derived from religion. It precedes it." Deriving morality from religion is really just being good "because god says so". Either that or one is moral because one fears going to hell or desires to go to Heaven. These desires and fears are pretentious at best and do not constitute a true motivation to be good.

    In a religious context, murder is often deemed wrong, for example, as god says so. The question is, does god say murder is wrong because murder is wrong and he wants people to know, or is murder wrong because god says so? The former would be admitting that murder is wrong independent of god, which means morality is not derived from god. The latter would be blind faith without logical and rational thinking.

    On the other hand, it is possible to attain morals from a humanistic way of thinking. Morality can be derived from the welfare or happiness of individuals and communities. More importantly, the idea is that reason can lead to morals being formed based on our ideas of the meaning of life and what we find worth living for. Secular humanism is an example of a set of morals that are derived from reason and rational thinking about human welfare.

  • Good without God

    Millions of people today identify as non-religious. Millions more today still subscribe to religion. Many of them, both non-religious/religious, are good people. Most people are moral.
    Competing religions, in both the old and modern world, perpetuate destruction. Religion is certainly not intrinsic to being a good person; just the opposite. One should do good deeds expecting no reward wether that be the promise of salvation or any other selfish reason. Secular values seem to be more encompassing, as opposed to the oppresive nature of religion that breeds bigotry.


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Sunfire315 says2015-11-10T23:32:47.977
I feel the OP is making a false dichotomy. Reason and belief in God are not opposed.