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Rehabilitation vs. retribution: Should the justice system focus on rehabilitation over retribution?

  • A Medium For Positive Change

    Educate ex inmates about real life and career development skills, educational opportunities, existing resources and organizations for treatment and support, create inspirational profiles of successful former inmates who have moved forward with their lives and stayed out of criminal justice system and they have turned their lives around.

    Paul Ferris

  • You have to help criminals, not punish and eventually release them.

    Retribution inevitably ends with a revolving doo jail system, which is a symptom of not fixing the problem, but hiding it. When the government focuses on jail time and not therapy, you end up with more people in jail which costs more money; not to mention the complete destruction of the life of the individual.

  • You have to help criminals, not punish and eventually release them.

    Retribution inevitably ends with a revolving doo jail system, which is a symptom of not fixing the problem, but hiding it. When the government focuses on jail time and not therapy, you end up with more people in jail which costs more money; not to mention the complete destruction of the life of the individual.

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  • Our focus should be on rehabilitation.



    I believe that it would be better for the future of our
    country if we focus on rehabilitation instead of retribution. When we put people in prison, they are no
    longer productive members of society.
    It is better to educate them in prison and then release them and give
    them a second chance.


  • Revolving door is a sign that rehabilitation isn't working

    Not that retribution is wrong. Perhaps sentences are too light. A murderer shouldn't have a revolving door because they shouldn't have a door in the first place. Instead we start with murder one plea down to 7-15yrs manslaughter then knock off a few years for "good behavior" and the guy gets out to offend again.

    Plea bargains shouldn't be offered: charge and convict for the crime that was done. Good behavior is ridiculous the sentence is the sentence. Being good/not getting caught doesn't do anything to recover the damage done to the victim so why should it recover time off the sentence?

  • Criminals Possess a different mindset

    Farnham 1, Doctor of Philosophy, St. John's University, in '08:"the offender has expressed the view that the victim is to be regarded as lesser, perhaps with the intention that the victim suffers from a lack of realization. He also proposes that society takes up his judgement and deny acknowledgement of the victim's realization."

  • Rehabilitation is rarely effective in any situation.

    We have this ideal that everybody deserves a second chance and that anybody can be rehabilitated, given the opportunity. However, this is simply not true. Many millions of drug users and addicts of all types genuinely want to be rehabilitated and fail. Instead of focusing resources on something that is unlikely to be successful, like rehabilitation, we should focus these resources on keeping criminals off the streets. We're not talking about retribution. We're talking about people facing consequences when they do the wrong thing. We're heading down a dangerous path as we move toward a blameless society where nobody is held accountable for their actions.


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