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Returning cultural treasures to country of origin: Should cultural treasures be returned to their country of origin?

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  • Yes they should

    Even if they area where the artifact is unsafe once it IS safe it should be sent back. Certain artifacts represent culture of their countries of origin. If you understand that the countries feel like their artifacts have been stolen or pillaged from their country then you can see how they Should be sent back to their country of origin!

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  • Yes, cultural treasures carry vast amount of significance to their respective countries.

    Cultural treasures should be displayed in the context in which they originated; only then can they be truly understood. In the case of the Elgin marbles this is an architectural context which only proximity to Some cultural treasures, e.G Native American artefacts, have religious and cultural associations for the area from which they were taken, but none for those who view them in sterile glass cases. To the descendants of their creators it is offensive to see aspects of their spirituality displayed for entertainment.The Parthenon itself can provide.Display of cultural treasures in western museums is a last hangover from Artefacts such as the Parthenon marbles were often acquired illegally, for example through looting in war (the Benin bronzes), under the duress of imperial force (many Chinese artefacts), or by bribing officials to ignore the carrying away of sculptures from monuments they were meant to be guarding (the Elgin marbles).The imperial belief that “civilised” states such as Britain were the true successors to Greece and Rome, and that the modern inhabitants of those ancient regions were unable to appreciate or look after their great artistic heritage. Whether that was true in the 19th century is open to doubt it certainly is not valid today and the display of imperial trophies in institutions such as the British Museum or the Louvre has become offensive.It may have been true that countries such as Greece were not capable of looking after their heritage in the past, but that has now changed. A state-of-the-art museum has now been completed in Athens to house the surviving marbles, while pollution control measures have reduced sulphur-dioxide levels in the city to a fifth of their previous levels. At the same time the curatorship of institutions such as the British Museum is being called into question, as it becomes apparent that controversial cleaning and restoration practices may have harmed the sculptures they claim to protect.

  • I have a DEBATE competition tomorrow on this topic

    I definitely believe that cultural treasure must be returned to their place of origin.
    Any property taken away without the consent of the owner: such an action amounts to theft. Hence the right of retention does not remain with the thief. In principle then, all other historical artefacts must be returned to the rightful countries of origin.

  • Yes, cultural treasures carry vast amounts of significance to their respective countries.

    So should the Rosetta Stone be returned to Egypt? Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Egyptian Council of Antiquities, certainly thinks so. He considers it an icon of Egyptian identity that was “raped” by French invaders and as such it belongs in Egypt, its homeland.

    His position isn’t quite as firm as it seems, however. He originally asked the British Museum to loan the Rosetta Stone (and several other iconic pieces) to Egypt for the opening of the new Grand Museum at Giza in 2013. The BM’s response was a less-than-felicitous questionnaire about security conditions in the new museum. It was only after that that Hawass shifted approach to demanding repatriation.

    The British Museum, for its part, considers the Rosetta Stone to be one of the jewels in its crown. It is the second most visited item (the first is a bog mummy) and most profoundly, it is a nucleus around which the great universal museum grew from modest beginnings as a glorified curiosity cabinet in 1753.

  • Yes, it should.

    Cultural treasures should be at their country origin, it just makes sense that way. The historians there would appreciate it so much, and it would become a great icon for museums and studies. We do not have a right to another countries treasure even if it was made years ago.

  • Yes, cultural treasures carry vast amounts of significance to their respective countries.

    Yes, cultural treasures should absolutely be returned to their country of origin because these items are valued very highly by the people of the country. Some cultural treasures are paramount in identifying what a certain country values and the beliefs they hold. If the object was not returned to the country of origin, it would be "wasted" on the people of the other country, who, more than likely, do not value the object as highly.

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  • Llamas are majestic and beautiful and should be respected.

    That's to get you to read this hopefully... If you were a explorer and you loved to explore and find lost treasures wouldn't you want to find something exotic and cool! If you were a explorer any flights you take or equipment you buy comes out of your own pocket, so you hope to find something of value right? Although if you have to return what you find then you get nothing, wouldn't that hinder your passion for finding things? If no one wants to find things than isn't it fair to say that not as much would be found? Also it most certainly is not the countries right to have that item. The people of the past didn't stamp their names on it. Do you write down on all your items meant for future Americans? Also if that country really wanted the items they would have searched for them themselves, the fact that others were more interested in finding things from other countries says a lot about its importance to them.
    Also if items had to be returned i almost guarantee that important items will be lost, stolen or sabotaged by terrorists. Please don't say that that would not happen because it has and will.
    Museums also rely on their variety of items from all places, take that away and the museums will fall and loose money.
    Also as mentioned by others, the museums we have here are maximum security to prevent items being damaged, stolen or destroyed. New museums such as the one mentioned by the third yes person, is highly similar to a adult handing a priceless set of diamonds to a child with dirty hands and is prone to braking things. You have a very little chance of getting them back in the condition they were given in. I could go on and on but i have a essay to write on this matter.

    Just remember llamas are majestic and beautiful #TWAIMZ

  • NO, the impracticality of such a venture far outweighs any possible benefits

    Imagine. You are a robber, hoping to get something that will have you living comfortably for the rest of your life. And then you hear that the Famous Mona Lisa is on its way to Italy - it's origin.
    Such a mammoth task such as returning treasures - even with modern transport links and technology - is extremely impractical. The risk of damage would be unavoidable; not to mention the risk of theft, sabotage or even terrorism.
    Also, in some cases the country of origin may not be suited to receive the priceless artefact's. For example developing countries might not have the resources to make a secure museum. In some cases, the treasures have been preserved better in their adopted country then they would've been in their homeland (for example precious wooden artefact's from Africa would have been destroyed in the heat)
    Should we rewrite history? Do we have a right to rewrite history? Often the adopted country of the treasure values it as much as the country of its origin; such as the Mona Lisa in France. Or, as another example, the Elgin marbles taken by Lord Elgin now now has a new chapter of history in its adopted homeland. In fact, Elgin saved the marbles from the Ottoman Empire who had no regard for them. Do we have a right to undo that?


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