Amazon.com Widgets

Ross Perot once wrote a blank check to help save the Treaty Oak in Texas after it was poisoned by vandals. Should more wealthy individuals contribute to the preservation of historical sites?

Ross Perot once wrote a blank check to help save the Treaty Oak in Texas after it was poisoned by vandals. Should more wealthy individuals contribute to the preservation of historical sites?
  • Yes, the wealthy should contribute to the preservation of historical sites.

    Yes, I do believe that more wealthy individuals should contribute to the preservation of historical sites if it has a meaning to them. Wealthy people can't be responsible for saving everything, but if there is a historic site that has meaning to them then they should help by donating rather than see the site go to waste.

  • Yes, I think so.

    What is historic, and worth saving, varies with the beholder, but some definition is urgent. Simply put, “historic” means “old and worth the trouble.” It applies to a building that’s part of a community’s tangible past. And though it may surprise cynics, old buildings can offer opportunities for a community’s future.

  • They can make their own choices.

    Many wealthy people give a great deal of money to charity. This is in addition to paying a larger share of their money in taxes than the middle class. If a wealthy person gives to charity it should be their choice. All Americans are wealthy compared to the rest of the world, so by that measure, all Americans should be writing blank checks for trees.

  • We should all work to preserve our history.

    We should all do our part in contributing to preserve our history, and it is certainly helpful when wealthy individuals are able to do so monetarily, but what is even more important in the effort to preserve our history, in situations like this, is education. If we can educate people about our history and the importance of it, and have them develop an appreciation and respect for it, we would see far fewer situation of vandalism and destruction.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.