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Should adopted children be able to meet their biological parents?

  • Case by case

    Until a kid is 18, it's up to the individual child's parents, who (presumably) have a better idea of what's best for the child. I personallytake my child's opinions into account if all else is equal. I would never force it on them, nor would I forbid it without a serious concern.

  • Case by case

    Until a kid is 18, it's up to the individual child's parents, who (presumably) have a better idea of what's best for the child. I personallytake my child's opinions into account if all else is equal. I would never force it on them, nor would I forbid it without a serious concern.

  • No argument here

    Children who are adopted will at some point have questions about where they came from or why they look the way they do. It is a natural reaction to want to know more things, it could be for the child's benefit to meet the birth parents to learn more about the culture and ethnicity they come from.

  • Adopted Children Should Be Able to Meet Biological Parents

    Yes, adopted children should be able to meet their biological parents once those children are 18 years of age. An adult has the right to know where she or he came from in terms of genetics. Also, the chance to develop a relationship with a biological parent would be an incredible experience.

  • "f" you whoever said no!

    Oh course. Telling a child that they have no right to meet their biological parents is wrong. Children can have close relationships with both their biological and adoptive parents. This whole idea of sealing birth certificates once a child is adopted and often restricting adoptes from finding out who their biological parents are is wrong and messed up. Adoptes biological parents are the ones who gave them life and it is totally immoral to stop a child from seeking their biological parents.

  • No argument here

    Adopted children know they're adopted at some point in their life. There's no reason to prevent them from meeting the parents who gave them up - after all, those may have been loving parents who wanted their kid to have a home with a more stable income or a better environment than they could provide. If the parents were jerks, there shouldn't be a legal restriction - the kid can choose not to deal with them instead. Restricting this would violate our freedom of personal choice, because there's nothing harmful about it 99% of the time (the 1% being physically abusive parents, who should get arrested anyway).

  • They should have the option

    People who adopt children usually treat them as if they were their own. In other words, the child will never feel as if its adoptive parents were any more distant towards them, as any biological parent is to their child. They would feel connected to their foster parents, and would have no need for their biological parents to be in their lives.

    Nevertheless, adopted children sometimes develop a complex. "Why did they give me away? Was I not good enough for them? Was I an accident?" are often questions these children ask themselves. Having the ability to ask their biological parents why it was they felt they should place them up for adoption would dramatically increase their self-esteem, and they could either get closure on the matter, or find out that being placed up for adoption was actually better for them.

    The foster parents would need to have a say in this, of course, but I believe that legally, the children should have this opportunity.

  • No, adopted children should not be able to meet their biological parents.

    I believe that adopted children should not be able to meet their biological parents. The problem is that many adopted children are adopted by new loving parents and meeting the biological parents could really upset the parents who adopted the child. The adopted parents have put a lot of time, energy, and money into the child. I think it would be a slap in the face to those parents to seek out the biological parents who gave the child up for whatever reason.

  • What about the rights of the person who gave up their parental rights?

    Having a child that was adopted could have negative effects on the person who gave up their rights. They may have gone on to be married, and have kids and their spouse never knew. They gave up the rights of being a parent. Even worse if they get in contact with the kids, and want them back... Before giving the child up for adoption they should have to check a box regarding weather or not they want anonymity. The 3rd party adoption center should however be able to send a message either way from the other. Sometimes it is important for medical reasons to know a little bit about your genetics and that is understandable.


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