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  • Yes, if you can get rid of some of the nuisance metals that currently limit how much of these biosolids we can use on fields and forests, and at the same time recover valuable metals and other elements, that’s a win-win.

    Scientists think that they may have found another purpose for feces that could not only save us a load of money but could also benefit the environment: use it as a source of precious metals and other valuable elements. If you can get rid of some of the nuisance metals that currently limit how much of these biosolids we can use on fields and forests, and at the same time recover valuable metals and other elements, that’s a win-win.

  • Yes, precious metals are needed

    Despite the fact that is seems unsanitary, precious metals should be retrieved from feces. Precious metals are a resource that our world needs and wherever they can be found, they should be retrieved. Obviously, there should be sanitation rules in place and it should be done carefully and supervised to make sure no one is getting sick. That said, it needs to be done.

  • We could try and retrieve precious metals from feces.

    We could try and retrieve precious metals from feces. Scientists at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, have already presented their findings, that human waste could contain precious metals like gold, silver and other minerals. If so there seems nothing wrong in retrieving precious metals from feces.

  • Remove at your own risk

    I don't see feces as being enough of a barrier to prevent people from try to retrieve precious metals from them, but they undoubtedly raise some health concerns. As long as people take the proper precautions to prevent disease, I don't see why they couldn't try to retrieve precious metals.

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