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  • Unconditional Basic Income

    Human reasons to work before basic income and our current work principle include money to live as the largest portion for human reasons to work. Small portions include self improve, enjoyment, meet people, help community. After basic income is a human right, money to live is no longer existential and our reasons to work are focused on self improve, enjoyment, meet people, help community and a small portion for money.

    "Unconditional basic income is not 'left or right'. It's Forward."

  • Unconditional Basic Income

    Human reasons to work before basic income and our current work principle include money to live as the largest portion for human reasons to work. Small portions include self improve, enjoyment, meet people, help community. After basic income is a human right, money to live is no longer existential and our reasons to work are focused on self improve, enjoyment, meet people, help community and a small portion for money.

    "Unconditional basic income is not 'left or right'. It's Forward."

  • Of course it should be.

    Each and every government is faced with a dilemma, "why does my country still have poverty?" At first, it seemed like a tax-free threshold would be enough as everyone would have the option of working enough to support themselves. After a while, we realised that certain welfare payments were necessary to keep people from poverty while they were studying, after retirement, during pregnancy, and during times which through no fault of their own, they became unemployed.

    This worked to an extent; however, poverty still remains. Why? Because there are sanctions, rules, and regulations that prevent some who need additional income support from receiving it. This is where basic income via a negative income tax or universal basic income guarantee comes in. Suddenly, we have a safety without any holes or gaps for people to fall through, but most importantly: no child grows up in poverty. You can argue that for whatever reason a grown adult has made their choices, whether right or wrong, to end up in a state of poverty; however, this is never the case for children. For this reason, it should be considered a human right.

  • Measuring hard work is useful to distribute rare resources. Yes the RARE resources!

    Basic things are economically cheap, so why should we have the abundance of food for example and forcing people to work for food? Let us keep the saying that income should be earned.. On the top of the basic income. Thats it! And since our economy is a fragile system lets not just give food to everybody on the sudden, but smoothly introduce a very low basic income that can transfer the society to the one where we work for only economically valuable things and not work for the amusement of the robot owner!

  • Work cannot be forced

    I am in favor of a volunteer society where people should have the right to choose if they want to work or not. This would reduce the amount of exploitation and people would have the right to refuse anything destructive and meaningless that they would do just because of necessity. People generally say: "but everyone would stop working". If so, there's something wrong with the WORK SYSTEM, not the worker, and this mistake would have to be fixed.
    Those who don't want to work would be reducing their own income, so, that's an exclusive disadvantage to them.
    You are not limited by the state, you are free to do whatever you want with your profit, you are free to choose what you want to do with your life. The economic wealth would be closer to everyone, so it would be easier for people to start their own business independently.
    Only those who care about individual freedom accept basic income.
    Basic income does not threaten capitalism and does not promote socialism either. It will only avoid exploitation.

  • Nobody should have to endure slavery

    A Basic Income guarantee would give power to the worker to refuse to do anything unethical or destructive, which is exactly what is missing today. Large corporations can get away with anything because no one is able to stand up to them without fearing for their means to survive. We could ask ourselves what the working conditions should be like instead of being forced to accept whatever your company deems adequate.

  • I strongly support a basic income.

    I believe in capitalism to an extent, I believe that people will and should work for what they want. However, I do not believe, that in today's modern society, people should need to work for what they need just to get by. There is much room for debate on what the basic income amount should be, but I feel that the concept of replacing the time consuming application process of welfare, unemployment and food stamps with a reliable basic income that is automatically there when people encounter difficult times. A basic income would both ensure people don't get left behind a flawed welfare system and would drastically reduce the complexity of the welfare system.

  • People should be able to live.

    People should be able to get enough that they can feed themselves and live decently. This doesn't mean that they should automatically get it, or get it without working, or anything like that-- it just means that it should be a human right that people should be able to get a basic income. I don't see why this is a bad thing.

  • Income Is Something You Earn

    By just giving everyone a bunch of money they will never know how to work for what they get. My mom drilled that into my brain in order to get money from her we had chores. If we didn't do them we didn't get money. Plus it'll make the economy go down even more and people will start thinking that they don't have to work.

  • No, socialism is not a human right

    Basic income is not a human right. Society has constructed multiple support systems for human beings to coexist and relate, namely families, religious institutions, and government. These support systems work together to do the work of society, from raising food to raising children. Basic income as a right would mean redistribution of all income and growth across the board. This would require a powerful central figure of some kind to make decision about who makes and who takes. It would fundamentally wreck society as we know it and it's not even possible to impose.

  • Income Is Something You Earn

    No, basic income should not become a human right. This program could eliminate poverty resulting in a more predictable and stable society as crime and violence would decay.
    It could, in addition to deliberate automation, diminish the work hours for full-time employers, giving people more time to friends and family and activities that enrich their lives thus increasing quality of life.
    Furthermore, since there is no means test; the richest as well as the poorest citizens would receive it which could manifest a positive psychological effect in people to spend less and appreciate leisure, which is ultimately good for the environment.

  • Income Is Something You Earn

    Whereas I can see where people are coming from when they say that basic income should be considered a human right, I feel like this is something that we should never encourage or do. Mainly, I wouldn't want to de-incentivize the need for people to go out and strive to be the very best that they can be. What do I mean by this? Well, if you were entitled to a basic income, what are the chances of you actually working as hard as you do right now? Probably slightly less, right? See, without this right, people are forced to earn their income just like everybody else. Sure, those who make very little income should be able to receive help from the government, but in no way should they feel entitled to a basic amount of money.

  • UBI is economically impossible without ruining a country

    The cost to implement this system far exceeds that for the introduction of Negative Income Tax (by roughly 100%) to yield the same results. This systems disincentivises people to work which would have a profoundly negative impact upon the aggregate demand of whichever country was unfortunate enough to have adopted a system of UBI.

  • Human right? No.

    While I am a proponent basic income in my country, calling it a "human right" goes too far. Nobody has the right to be handed free goods, services, or income from another citizen for doing nothing. Basic income is an economic tool to alleviate poverty, simplify the complex web of government welfare programs, and give unskilled workers some negotiating power with their employers. Not a human right.


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