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Should children have to consent to adoption?

Asked by: Arganger
  • Children may know what's best for themselves

    Sometimes many people underestimate the opinion of children, but sometimes they can know what's best for themselves. When it comes to adoption its really up to the parents meeting the specific legal requirements to be able to support for the children. This means that children may not have a whole lot in common, much less feel comfortable with their new parents, but of course that's still legal because the parents met the legal requirements. But the problem of the kids not feeling comfortable of having much in common with their parents can turn into a much bigger problem because of Attachment disorder, according Huffington post this is a disorder common among adopted children which causes them to have trouble bonding and emotionally connecting with their family. So children should have to consent in adoption due to the fact that if they don't feel comfortable with their new family it may open up a platform for worsening attachment disorder and other mental conditions.

    Sourcing
    http://www.Huffingtonpost.Com/lisa-belkin/adoption-spanking-childabuse_b_1081617.Html

  • Children aren't always wrong

    Whilst the whole are children able to consent thing is up in the air due to new pro-pedophilia types and their relentless backlash.

    I think it's appropriate to explore and discussion the broad horizon known as children's rights and as a Libertian/Anarcho-Capitalist (who also loves freedom, constitutional rights', and happens to be informed.) I say no to children's rights and yes to children's freedoms.

    The difference between freedom and rights is easy because rights come from the Constitution and of course freedoms come from legislation allowing so.

    Now children know themselves and types of people they like and can have a sixth-sense sort of thing that allows them to be suspicious and speculative of adults who might not have the best interest for either of them.

  • They have rights to

    What if the kid did not want to be adopted!!!!! You cant force a kid in to something with out guilt! You need to hear me out! The people dont have souls if they think that they can force a kid into something they dont want!!! They have rights to

  • They call them children but they're human as well.

    All humans should have the rights to pick what kind of future they want. Adoption is a "rest of life" thing not just a "who do you want to be partners with for this project" in elementary school. I know a guy who has been sent to 15 different families and now he has mental disabilities and no one really likes him. I'm pretty sure that if he had some kind of control over which family he wanted to be part of he wouldn't have ended up like this. If this is how some children will end up from not being able to chose what family they want to be in then screw it let them chose. It's their life. People could give them advice but at the end it should all be the child's choice. If you forced a child into a family they don't prefer that wouldn't be much different than force marriage. Why is force marriage more important than this topic. I think both are really important topics to be discussed.

  • Children are humans, not property

    However superior an adult's judgement may be when it comes to the welfare of a child. The fact of the matter is, children are human and have the right to make such a choice. By consenting to being adopted a child is signing off some of their rights to an adopter, so they should have the right to do so. Otherwise, the child becomes merely a commodity for a prospective parent to shop for. By having the child and the parent both sign an adoption agreement, there would be more of a duty for both the parent and child to make it work

  • Children are humans, not property

    However superior an adult's judgement may be when it comes to the welfare of a child. The fact of the matter is, children are human and have the right to make such a choice. By consenting to being adopted a child is signing off some of their rights to an adopter, so they should have the right to do so. Otherwise, the child becomes merely a commodity for a prospective parent to shop for. By having the child and the parent both sign an adoption agreement, there would be more of a duty for both the parent and child to make it work

  • To an extent

    Obviously, a lot of young kids aren't mature enough (for lack of a better word) to have the end say on who adopts them, the most important thing is that they get a good home, a good family, and get out of the system.
    The next most important thing is that the child goes to a family they love and (can) get along with, at least most of the time, and this is where I think the child consent comes in. A child shouldn't have to go to with parents that they don't let along with, I'm not talking about trivial things like "I don't like what they eat" etc. I mean major personality clashes, or a major difference in beliefs (this aimed towards the older kids that have the ability to have strong beliefs). If the child feels like the family won't be a good match, I don't see why they should be forced to live with them unless it's absolutely necessary.

  • Children are not robots, they also have autonomous minds just like anyone else. They are not slaves.

    I fully support the idea of having children consent to adoption first We should STOP this whole "children don't have rights and must obey until 18" argument. Children are NOT slaves,but living and breathing things who also have autonomous minds just like everyone else. Imagine if a children finally got someone offering to adopt them but before they realize,they turn out to be cruel to them and they cant say "I wont go with them" because it is already set in stone and they have no say in the matter. Would you WANT that,cons? And by the way,about that "abortion" comment,this is a consent to ADOPTION. NOT ABORTION. You misspelled it. So it is invalid.

  • Yes, even a child has a right to voice out their thoughts

    Adoption is a pretty serious thing. Parents are expected to give serious thoughts particularly about them adopting. They have to carry the burden and joys of growing a child on their own. Most parents aren't pretty serious when it comes to these things. They view children as something not as much valuable, and these are common mistakes. A child has a right to consent to adoption, just like the parents, they are supposed to be given time for them to decide whether they want to be adopted and be part of a certain family or not. Adoption agencies these days are akin to adopting a dog, and us humans, yes, even children, are far more given superiority than them. So, why aren't we any better? Children's consent to adoption brings a whole lot more good things than bad, in the aspect of both the parents, the agency, and the children themselves.

  • There are several barriers when it comes to adoption.

    The long waiting period is enough for potential adopters to drop out of the process and seek international adoption agencies instead. Plus, there are tacit requirements like a flexible work schedule, a big house, high income, etc. In Mississippi, gays and interracial adoption is forbidden despite how many unwanted babies get added into the system due to the state's abortion policy. My husband is a doctor and I work part-time. We can adopt or have kids but we chose not to. Instead, we fostered pets. Not everyone intends to have children. It just happens! And adoption hardly crosses the minds of those individuals.

  • This is insane.

    If a child is in their mother's womb, how do they decide whether to be aborted or not? They don't even know what abortion is. They can't talk or anything like that. And once they can decide whether to be aborted, it's too late! What are you people thinking? This is a pretty weird joke.

  • Makes no sense.

    Do people who are raised by their biologic parents have a say as who the parents should be? No, so why should they?
    Kids up for adoption often have a hard time getting adopted in the first place. Giving a kid the choice just eliminates even more permanent homes they could end up in. This means they spend even more time in temporary homes. The longer they take to get a permanent home, the more times they will be shuffled from one foster home to another.

  • It was a good debate

    I think so that if more afford will be given then it can be more wonderful and it can be presented in a wonderful manner so that it can become the best debate . I hope that you will listion to my advice and do a bettor next time .

  • No, the important thing should be the best interests (in the long term) of the child

    Which end of the adoption is this question about? If it's about the parents giving the child up for adoption, no parent should be forced to continue being a parent (though they may be required to pay child support). The child might want them to, but the child doesn't understand that an unwilling parent is not in his or her best interests over the long term.

    If it's about who gets to adopt the child then the most important thing is the best interests of the child. If the child has an objection then the judge should consider it, but the child's wishes should not be the only thing that is considered.

    Children don't usually think about the long term and it's their best interests over the long term that should be important.

  • Nope. Nada. No.

    Do you not understand the how foster system works? Every home is investigated before they just place a child in a home. Obviously, sometimes an investigation can slip through the cracks and a child gets abused. But, case workers constantly follow-up with children in the foster homes and see how they are doing. At any time, when a child feels that they aren't a proper fit for the home, they tell the case-worker, and often times they are moved to new home and new child takes their place.

    Do you think a child is able to recognize the signs of an abusive home? Do you think a child would even be able to perform an evaluation of the adults, or even know what is ACTUALLY best for them? A foster home isn't a hotel where you can leave a bad review and check in somewhere else. This is supposed to be a permanent HOME. You are asking a child to make a decision that could affect the rest of their lives. If the home that child chooses turns out to be abusive...That is a VERY harsh and early lesson that child has learned that didn't have to happen..Had a qualified adult chosen the home. You people are acting like children have absolutely NO CHOICE in their homes. If a child likes a specific home, or has heard good things about it, the case worker will take it under consideration.

  • Think it through

    I agree that perhaps children do know what is best for themselves and maybe some children would be better off given the choice of who the parents are, however, this only applies to a certain percentage of children, you cannot simply assume that all children would be capable of making a decision this important, a child needs guidance and I agree that a large percentage would, given the option, choose to have a choice over this matter. But regarding the other half of children who in the end are not capable of making this decision, defeats the point in children choosing their parents in the first place. Do remember, that children will choose parents on not necessarily their parenting, but rules and restrictions, I know for a fact that when I was younger, we all preferred the laid-back teachers in comparison to the strict ones, but it doesn't make them better teachers.

  • Are you joking?

    Kids shouldn't have to choose a house that they have no idea of who is going to love them or who is going to ruin their whole lives. I am more experienced with this problem because I once, no, 11 times, have gone through adoption and I didn't need to choose any houses.

  • A child may have a voice but that doesnt mean es old enough to use it.

    As a child i always wanted to get put up for adoption. I didn't really like my family so i figured that was the best way to leave. My family realy did love me even though they were rough sometimes but it was out of love and they were trying to raise me right.

  • There are several barriers when it comes to adoption.

    The long waiting period is enough for potential adopters to drop out of the process and seek international adoption agencies instead. Plus, there are tacit requirements like a flexible work schedule, a big house, high income, etc. In Mississippi, gays and interracial adoption is forbidden despite how many unwanted babies get added into the system due to the state's abortion policy. My husband is a doctor and I work part-time. We can adopt or have kids but we chose not to. Instead, we fostered pets. Not everyone intends to have children. It just happens! And adoption hardly crosses the minds of those individuals.

  • There are several barriers when it comes to adoption.

    The long waiting period is enough for potential adopters to drop out of the process and seek international adoption agencies instead. Plus, there are tacit requirements like a flexible work schedule, a big house, high income, etc. In Mississippi, gays and interracial adoption is forbidden despite how many unwanted babies get added into the system due to the state's abortion policy. My husband is a doctor and I work part-time. We can adopt or have kids but we chose not to. Instead, we fostered pets. Not everyone intends to have children. It just happens! And adoption hardly crosses the minds of those individuals.


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