Amazon.com Widgets

Should Chinese Restaurant Allowed Kids Working There?

Asked by: AllenGaming
  • It's family owned.

    So of course they would have parental permission. In many cases, the child may not even get paid for his time at work but that does not mean they do not benefit from it. Family run businesses tend to stay in the family so they may either inherit the business, profit as a part owner, or profit by being bought out by a sibling. Some may even take the money and knowledge they gained and open their own business. In the mean time, the money saved by the business by using family members can be used to either make it survive or expand, making their possible inheritance either more assured or more valuable.

    I think all kids should be encouraged to get a job.
    1) It provides families with extra income. This extra income may help families make ends meet or could be used to help fund college.
    2) It provides the child with a feeling of self worth.
    3) It keeps them occupied instead of getting into trouble.
    4) It provides prior work experience that can be useful for getting a job as an adult.
    5) It teaches a child responsibility and has them practice skills they will use in the future.

    Contrary to AllenGaming's statement, kid 14 and 15 can work in many businesses but under various conditions. Fact is, even kids under 14 can have some jobs such as paper deliver, acting, or agriculture related. Growing up in an area of farming, I know many kids who drove a tractor down the road long before they were old enough to get a learners permit to drive.

    As long as the job does not put the child in unreasonable danger, I don't see the problem, but see only benefits.

  • It depends on the work they do and how old they are

    Child labor laws are good. There are things children should not be doing. It is also important to guarantee children are still getting an education and that they are not being overworked.

    However, if they are teenagers then a little part-time work is OK, so long as it is not dangerous. Most work in a restaurant is not dangerous. It's the kind of work kids do at home when they do chores. That can only be good for the kids. They see how a business is run, they get experience working. They will be better prepared when they are adults.

  • I dont live in china so i dont care really

    Jdsbhfurwhcbiwdbcuwiebciyebchboiuheficbqpowuenciwebciuobn h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h gf f f f f f f f f f f f bf g g g g g g g g g g g g g gg g

  • It's a family business!

    Whether its a Chinese owned restaurant, or any business at that, the family has a right to what goes on in the business. If they, as parents, require their children to help out around the restaurant, then so be it. In the same way other parents will usually require their children to do certain chores around the house, some restaurant owners may ask of their children to help out with the business; this does not signify the kind of child labor prevented by law.

  • Child Labor Laws Says So!

    Many Chinese people came from China to America to have a better life but however the parents needs kids to help run the business while there's tons of Chinese restaurant out there! Child Labor Laws states that 16 or older can work in the business. State your opinion and explain why?

  • They should not have the obligation to be working.

    As a American Born Chinese(ABC), my parents owned a Chinese restaurant. Though it may seem to provide these children with business experiences, it often placed a lot of pressure upon me as an individual. As I child, I always wanted to strive for the best, for I did not want to work in the same industry as I grew older. Especially during my high school years, it grew extremely difficult and stressful to balance between school work and the required "obligations" to go there and work everyday. It placed a lot of pressure and led to mental breakdowns and eventually even thoughts of suicide as a result of all I had to do. I often had to stand up and pull a smile upon my face even when I felt like crying and collapsing wasn't an option. This placed traumas upon me as a child and made me feel isolated and different from my peers and often felt like I didn't fit in. Over the years it has left a scar on me and I don't wish for the same for others who have similar family backgrounds.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.