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Should college football players earn part of the revenue made from playoffs?

  • College Football Players Underpaid in Multimillion Dollar Industry

    NCAA athletes are the supporting structure that allows an industry that makes millions every year on merchandising and tickets to exist. Football is generally a money-making sport for universities (as opposed to water polo, golf, etc.) and it is not unreasonable that college football players earn part of the revenue made from playoffs. It makes no sense to have coaches earning million-dollar salaries while players are prohibited from making any money whatsoever. While a college degree can be valuable, players are gambling constantly against injury, and could be helped significantly by being allowed an income from the game while they are young and healthy.

  • College football players should receive no money

    College football players are amateur athletes and should be treated as such. They already receive full scholarships that replace the debt that most students face. Plus the experience is a resume builder and something they can cash in on after their playing career is over. Look at all the money Tim Tebow as made!

  • No, players should not earn part of the revenue from playoffs.

    While football may be an important part of any university, football programs, including the athletes, already receive such a high percentage of funding. The revenue should go to the university and be distributed to academic pursuits. These could be scholarships for underprivileged students, or the money could go toward the arts.

  • Keep College Football Players in Game for Right Reason

    In no way shape or form should college football players earn part of the revenue made from playoffs. This would go against the very grain of sports at this level. College sports are meant to be a fair and fun competition with the eventual goal to be crowning a champion.


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