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  • I sure am,

    If the student is dedicated to school and work then they will be able to get by. I work about 29 hours a week being a sales lead at a lady footlocker and go to college 8am-5:05pm Tuesdays and Thursdays. So far I am passing my first year of college and doing good at my job. My parents still pay for all my bills except gas so I am pretty much just working to buy stuff and save for a house when I finish school.

  • Yes work is needed

    It teaches you to focus on more than one issue at a time regardless of the level of difficulty. Not to mention the experience in having to perform for people and the real world rather than college professors. College is about learning how to study and take tests. Work is about learning how to apply your own ability and work ethic.

  • Yes college students should work at least part time while in school for more than one reason.

    First, it helps the student gain experience so after college they have a job reference and something to list on their resume. Second, it helps them learn to handle real life situations and responsibilities. Life won't always be easy and you can't always just quit your job because something else comes up that needs your attention, learn to multi-task, organize, and prioritize. Third, if a student wants to be there, wants to learn and grow, it will not matter if they have a part-time, full-time, or no job at all. I have worked full-time, gone to a university full-time, have a husband and two young children, and I still managed to make a good enough GPA to be a member of the Honor Society.

  • Yes students can work

    I work about 3 to 4 jobs and go to school full time and able to maintain good grades. It's all about time management. If you learn how to manage your time it should be pretty easy to work and attend school. As long you can fit in time to study and do your work you should be ok. Some students can probably do their school work at their job. I know I do sometimes.

  • College students should work.

    As a former college student I completely agree that college students should work. It is the best thing to have on a resume that you have work experience while you are in college. It shows that you are active and hard working and willing to go the extra mile to prove yourself as someone who wants to do something with their life. Also, having the extra cash while in college is so amazingly good.

  • Students should work

    Students should work while attending college. There are many benefits that go along with having the responsibilities of school, along with the commitments and expectations of work. Students who work during college learn time management skills, build character, and build their resumes for future employment. It is important to diversify your skills and experiences while you are in college so that you will be well-rounded and be more likely to meet the expectations of future employers. Working can also allow you to make connections with companies or businesses within your study of interest. Opportunities like these will give you a competitive advantage and set you apart from others.

  • I work and go to school at the same time

    I would not recommend being 17 working almost full time hours like I do, and still going to college. On the other hand having a job builds character, and will help you in the future. I know that my job at a big retailer, not going to say who, is not a dream job, but will provide me with vital experience that will help me later on in life. It would be nice to be able to not work, but when you have brothers and sisters that your need your support then its just not a choice to stay at home. If you do not have to work, I would still recommend getting a part time job.

  • Only Part-Time -- If related to your future career, BONUS!

    I think it is important for college students to work a part time job. It helps a great deal with preventing procrastination and requires the student to be more organized. Students should be working less than 20 hrs per week and be working for someone that is flexible to their constantly changing schedules. Working a job on campus that is affiliated with the university is the best way to go. They usually pay the best, are easy to get to, work around your schedule, and you get all university holidays/breaks off (usually).

  • Yes

    I believe college students should work, but only with a part time focus. Trying to work a full time job while attending college will not only affect your quality of work, but your quality of education as well. A student needs to be find the correct balance of work to schooling to be able to excel in both areas of their lives.

  • Yes, but not full-time.

    College students should have some kind of part-time job in order to begin getting new skills and developing workplace responsibility. But their primary job is to be a student first and foremost, and so they should limit the amount of time they spend at a job to 15 to 20 hours a week. Otherwise, school takes a back seat and they are not investing the effort needed for true success and enrichment.

  • If you don't have to..

    One downside to working in college, however, is the potential for students to work so much that their jobs interfere with their college goals and academic progress. If you don't have to work while in college you shouldn't. If your bills are being paid and you're being fed what is the point?

  • Not if they don't have to!

    Full-time class load (9 to 12 credit hours) is a full-time job! Students should not be required to work, especially not full-time. They deserve an opportunity to focus on school and yes, relax and party some. No burn out necessary! I work full-time and part-time (two jobs) and take a full-time load. You best believe I struggle to be a C student but I have bills to pay. Not right...

  • College Students Need To Concentrate On Grades

    No, college students should not work. College has a lot of homework and research requirements. Because college grades are so critical, students should be able to devote as much time as necessary to their classes without having to worry about work. If a student has made the commitment to attend college, they need to be able to give it their all. Students will have time enough after college to work enough hours to support themselves and pay off their student loans.

  • Not everyone can handle both.

    Knowing me, I would fail at school with a job.. It already stresses me out enough as is! I cannot imagine having any kind of job, I'm always freaking out about things I have to study, homework, getting good grades, tests, paying attention to deadlines, and not forgetting things. You have no idea how many employed students I see who come unprepared for class, not show up, do worse on assignments, fail, and drop out entirely. As of right now, I am blessed to not have to work.. And I believe that no college student should work unless they really need to. I understand bills have to be paid and mouths have to be fed, so in those dire situations, it's understandable. But for those who still live with "mommy and daddy" and do not HAVE to work, what's the point? It's best that one joins clubs, makes connections, volunteer, or do something that has to do with his or her major.

  • Full-Time Student, Focus and That's It.

    I believe it depends on the individuals character. Some people feel the need to be busy all of the time with little rest time. Others believe that focusing is the key to success. I believe that when a student is given the opportunity to focus, he or she can actually excel in their career path. Students are preparing themselves for a professional career and we do not want anymore half-ass employees who are not properly educated or unqualified in the US economy. While a student is in college all excess time should be devoted to studying, exercising preparing meals and resting; all of which support the students success during college and ensure the student will leave school prepared. After college, the student has the foundation of discipline, balance and health which will show as a strong trait in his or her career path. Another point is: if the student is going to college, the student certainly is not spending thousands of dollars and hours in order to earn a retail job so why even discuss experience in something that is not related. It is good to learn to be on time, speak kindly to people, do whatever they ask, and then get paid a bit but in reality it usually has nothing to with the degree or real career path the person is studying for; the student just needs a little money. If the student got a job that is related to his or her career, then it should be considered but even then the student must know if it is manageable. The student should understand that there are limitless opportunities in this vast world and tons of things to do; that not every opportunity will be the last and focus.

  • Working too hard leads to dropping out

    My friend works in the restaurant industry being a hostess, she makes good cash but one morning she woke and didn't go to her finals. She dropped out sophomore year. Her dad paid her rent and her bills, she was on scholarship, it was all extra money. If you're in that type of situation, they why?

  • It hinders progress.

    I don't believe students should work while attending university and if they do it should be a very minimal amount.

    When attending school a student's job should be mastery of their classes. They should learn the material and work towards being able to apply it to the real world. Education is what leads to progress in all areas. It needs to be our focus and not just a hoop to jump through.

    I also don't think students should be in school to only socialize or to earn worthless degrees. They should be there to gain tangible skills and all their efforts should be focused on accomplishing that task. When this occurs they will be better prepared to enter the workforce and contribute to society.

    Splitting your focus on multiple areas rarely leads to superior results in either.

  • Shout out to those who maintain a 4.0 while working...But don't work unless you HAVE to:

    I'm currently a part time college student until after this semester where I will be full time and I have been battling with the idea of working while trying to keep a 4.0 GPA. I feel like a disappointment if I don't work while in school but making sure I get an A in all my classes is more important to me. For me, I feel like unless you absolutely have to work to pay bills, etc, then you should find time to do so. But other than that, I do not feel that working compares to getting the highest possible grades. I would say for college students to volunteer in fields that go towards their major and what they plan to do for a career. To me, that is way more beneficial on a resume than showing you worked part time at a grocery store or at the mall and not having done something that relates to your future goals. Yes, working and studying helps one learn how to balance time and work hard, but so does volunteering or doing something you enjoy while being a student. If you are not able to live up to the standards you put for yourself in school, then you should not work. However, if you are willing to settle for less than what you feel you can achieve while working, then do so.

  • It depends on your major and living situation

    If you are majoring in something challenging like computer science or engineering, it is much more impressive to devote yourself to school and earn a high GPA (and even get a few internship experiences along the way). If your major may not be as employable, a safer option would be to work part time while attending class. If you live on campus, you may not have enough time to work; if you live at home, chances are you don't have to worry about paying bills, but if you DO need the money, the obvious solution would be to work. People should focus on resume builders outside of work, a volunteer opportunity or internship related to your actual major is more valuable than work experience at a fast food place or retail outlet. Prioritize what will look impressive to future employers.

  • You're not fully devoted

    I give 100% to everything that I do. If I work (and I did work for 2 years) I devote my time to that. I pick up extra shifts, and do housework. If I go to school, I study 7 days a week, and am either in class, or studying 8-12 hours a day to maintain a 4.0. And yes, I still do housework.

    Burnout is the reason many of my friends dropped out. The fact is you can't do it all, and if you are doing it all, you're not giving it 100%.


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