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Should consumers be alarmed at the extent to which glitter is used in everyday products now that law enforcement has identified it as a type of forensic evidence?

Should consumers be alarmed at the extent to which glitter is used in everyday products now that law enforcement has identified it as a type of forensic evidence?
  • No responses have been submitted.
  • Consumers should not be alarmed, but aware.

    I do not believe consumers should be alarmed at the prevalence of glitter in common, everyday products, but simply make themselves aware of it. If you've ever had experience with a product that has glitter on or in it, you know how glitter has a habit of finding itself a home anywhere and everywhere, even places you could never imagine it could end up. Being aware of how glitter behaves is sufficient; there should be no grounds for concern.

  • Almost everything is forensic evidence.

    The ordinary consumer should have nothing to fear from the revelation that glitter can be used as a type of forensic evidence. Everything, from cigarette butts to tiny flakes of human skin can be taken and used as forensic evidence and this has not caused widespread problems for any individuals who have not committed crimes.

  • No, they should not.

    Glitter might be an effective tool for forensic evidence, but it is not something that most people should be alarmed about. It could actually be helpful. Glitter is alarming because it gets everywhere. It is hard to get out of your clothes and hair, and you may find yourself sweeping it up years later.

  • None of the things I buy include glitter.

    I don't buy a thing that I think contains glitter. What in everyday use does a person use that has to have glitter in it? And why would you be worried about it unless you are planning to commit a crime. I think this is just an odd thing to get worried about.


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